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SuggestiON-AIR - Best Prolific Musicians

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ATL | 13:37 UK time, Monday, 10 October 2011

 

On this week's Across The Line radio show, our special house band is in the form of Martin Byrne's 'Song A Day For A Year' project. From January 1st 2011, Martin Byrne has been writing, recording and performing (with the help of some guests) a brand new original piece of music every day. He's set to carry on doing this to January 1st 2012, which safely qulifies him (we reckon) as one of the most prolific musicans in the world today.

With that in mind, we started to think about the best prolific musicians that never really disappoint. Those bands that seem to retain quality, album after album. Let us know who you would pick on Facebook /Twitter or you can text 81771 after 8pm tonight. Here's team ATL's picks...


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REM
Rigsy - ATL Presenter

While I've barely mustered an iota of interest in anything they've released in the last ten years, I'll never grow tired of their first 8 albums. Every one is completely different, a total reinvention. And just as it is with the Beatles, a proper REM fan struggles to name his/her all time favourite song or album - it changes all the time, matching your mood and your outlook.

 

The Beatles
Amy McGarrigle - ATL Producer
Twelve albums in numerous styles within seven years! Part and parcel of being a band in the sixties,  The Beatles debut album Please Please Me was released in 1963, while the follow up With the Beatles was recorded just four months later. The Beatles are one of those bands that suggest being prolific can lead to genius with Rubber Soul, Revolver, Sgt Peppers Loney Hearts Club Band, The White AlbumAbbey Road and Let it Be all being released within a year of each other. No Chinese Democracy in sight!

 

 

The Fall
Cameron Mitchell - ATL Content Assistant
The Fall have churned out an amazing twenty-nine studio albums since their incarnation in the late 70’s. Always on the periphery of British culture, the only constant figure throughout this vast discography is the legendary awkward Mark E Smith. Some of the albums are good, some are rubbish, some are genius. For me its albums like The Nation’s Saving Grace and Extricate that stick out from the rest, but as John Peel once described, "They are always different, they are always the same”.

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