Introducing iWonder guides for the World War One season

Sunday 19 January 2014, 14:59

Tim Plyming Tim Plyming Executive Producer

BBC iWonder interactive guide to World War One BBC iWonder interactive guide to World War One

Central to the BBC’s ambition for the World War One season is the desire to reintroduce audiences to a war they think they know. At the heart of that ambition is the BBC’s digital offer, bringing together the BBC’s TV and radio programming, news and features alongside exclusive, in-depth and interactive online content, allowing audiences to explore new perspectives on the war that changed everything. 

Today, we’re launching the first set of BBC iWonder interactive guides to support the BBC’s World War One season. iWonder is the new brand from the BBC designed to unlock the learning potential of all BBC content, curated by experts and BBC Talent. The first iWonder content is focused on World War One, but in time, iWonder will provide compelling content across all the BBC’s factual and education genres. 

Fundamental to iWonder is the interactive guides’ format and these provide the perfect platform for audiences to explore new perspectives on the War by combining video, audio, text and graphic content – taking them on journeys through key themes within World War One – all available from www.bbc.co.uk/ww1

When we started to plan the first set of interactive guides for World War One we focused on the common misconceptions around the War with the desire to challenge myths and perceptions. For example, we have developed a guide with Dan Snow around the widely held view that the majority of soldiers died in the trenches – the truth is that nearly 90% of soldiers survived war in the trenches. We have worked hard to collate content which will deepen audiences understanding of central war topics and with the first set of interactive guides, looking at how we think of generals, the role of women as well as looking at huge advances in medicine, the postal service and communications.

Journalist Kate Adie

We have been lucky to work with some great talent across the World War One season including Kate Adie (pictured above), Ian McMillan, Frank Gardner, Alan Johnson and Shirley Williams. The iWonder interactive guides have given our presenters the chance to explore the themes within World War One which interest them the most.

The process of creating the first set of iWonder guides has been fantastic, working with online production teams based in Glasgow, Cardiff and London. In the past week we have been have been filming with Gareth Malone for an interactive guide looking at how the popular song Pack up Your Troubles became the viral hit of World War One.

The iWonder approach and interactive guide format is allowing us to explore a huge range of subject areas and we hope to publish over 100 World War One interactive guides through 2014.

I am certain that the iWonder interactive guides will be a new and exciting way for the BBC to create compelling content. The format has been designed with BBC’s four screen strategy firmly in mind which means you can enjoy this great content whenever and wherever you are - whether you’re using a smartphone, tablet or desktop device.You can read more about the format of iWonder interactive guides from my colleague Andy Pipes’ post on the BBC Internet Blog

We’re very excited to share these new, content rich iWonder interactive guides with you and I hope that our audiences will enjoy using our iWonder guides to explore the war we think we know so well.

Tim Plyming is Executive Producer, Knowledge and Learning

 

  • See more of the new World War One iWonder guides on the BBC's World War One website.
  • More information about the iWonder guides can be found on the Media Centre website.
  • Controller Adrian Van Klaveren explained how the BBC's is marking the centenary of World War One in a post on the About the BBC Blog last year. He also highlighted some of this year's programming in a post published on 1 January this year. 
  • Watch the World War One season launch trailer on YouTube

 

Comments

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  • rate this
    +1

    Comment number 1.

    The WWW1 in German East Africa went on for two weeks after it had ended in Europe.
    Soldiers had to facetes tse flies mosquitoes, wild animals as well as German soldiers and their African askaris.
    Why do we not hear more about this theater of war? Personal interest...my father fought for the British.
    A Khan

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 2.

    I groaned when your introduction said the song "Pack up your Troubles" went "viral". OMG - the first hint of a dumbed down history! When will we hear Dan Snow asking - what might the twitter exchange have been between Haig and Ludendorff; what might Lloyd George have put in his blog after the first day of the Somme offensive? Try and widen the topics - are we going to hear about the rapid growth in numbers, unionisation and increased militancy of industrial workers?

  • rate this
    +2

    Comment number 3.

    Good work BBC - I am sure this has been many months in the making and it looks great. I love the fact that we have so much time to explore what went on and I'm looking forward to many months of informed analysis and understanding of this extraordinary world changing event. Great launch!

  • rate this
    0

    Comment number 4.

    Would this project be interested in something on the chivalry that supposedly existed between fighter pilots on both sides? There may have been some unwritten rules between the earliest fighter pilots of the war, but by 1915 aerial combat had started to evolve from a particularly deadly form of 'sport' into industrialised warfare and, as air fighting became more practical, tactics evolved and the air war became more pragmatic and ruthless it became increasingly less 'knightly' and increasingly ruthless instead. At the start of the war opposing pilots were still finding their feet within the new form of warfare. By the end of the war they tended more to possess the flying skill of a pilot, the marksmanship of a hunter and the coldness of an executioner or assassin. I'd be keen to provide the text if the Beeb could provide me with a brief to follow.

  • rate this
    -1

    Comment number 5.

    A very good book to read on WW1 and all of the Black Adder misconceptions is Mud Blood and Poppycock by Gordon Corrigan.

    Well done BBC a good start to a very different time when people were proud to be British and serve. They might of been naïve and blinkered by todays standards but that's why we need a fresh view of that time.

 

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