Today the BBC announced that it has commissioned a piece of research to help us gain a deeper understanding into how the lesbian, gay and bisexual (LGB) community are portrayed across all our services.

We will talk to audiences up and down the UK so that we get the widest range of views and opinions about how they think we're portraying LGB people across everything we do; whether it's television, radio or online

We'll ask people their views on language, tone, stereotyping, on screen talent, humour and scheduling to name just a few areas, and I'm sure will uncover many others that will deepen our understanding of you.

This is the most comprehensive piece of research ever carried out in this area by the BBC and we're doing it because, as a public service broadcaster, we have a responsibility to serve all of our audiences and it's vital that we reflect the differences among all of the UK's diverse communities, nations and regions.

The work- which is being conducted by research agency 2CV who have experience in in-depth audience research - will be supported by an online questionnaire which you will find at http://www.perceptor.com/perceplive/survey/bbc_lgb_portrayal. This questionnaire is open for anyone to answer and we are actively encouraging as many people as possible to participate and have their views recorded.

Additionally throughout the process we'll be in contact with LGB community organisations across the UK. In this way, through the research, via the online questionnaire and engaging with grass-root organisations we will hear from as many voices as possible.

This work is being driven by a pan-BBC Working Group on Portrayal and Inclusion of Lesbian, Gay and Bisexual Audiences, which I chair. It was set up last year to examine how we portray this section of our diverse audience - in part because we know that LGB communities are concerned about how they are portrayed in the media - but also because the licence fee and our public purposes means it is our job to reflect the diversity of the nation and to do that well.

The remit of this working group reflects our overall diversity strategy and builds on similar work we have carried out in recent years with other distinct audience groups.

For example, last year we conducted audience research looking at disability portrayal and we are currently looking at regional audiences - all as part of our ongoing commitment to serve all licence-fee payers.

As part of an ongoing conversation we have with our audiences on a range of issues and topics we want and expect it to make a difference.

When the research findings are delivered this summer I think we can expect an in-depth - and perhaps surprising - reflection of your range of views on how we're serving you.

The findings will be embedded in programme making at the BBC - made available to all programme makers, commissioners and other key decision makers at the BBC to ensure that when we make editorial decisions that there is continued consideration of LGB storylines or characters based on the best information and research about what audiences want and expect.

We will also make recommendations to the BBC's Diversity Board, chaired by Mark Thompson, and we intend to publish a full report which will be made available widely.

Like all my colleagues on the working group, I am genuinely excited about the prospect of getting to that stage.

We are aware that people may have strong views, both positively and negatively, about how the BBC is portraying the LGB community across our services and that's why it's so important to hear what you're thinking. Only in this way can the BBC be part of a real step change in delivering accurate, authentic portrayals of LGB people's lives.

I look forward to sharing the research when it's complete. Until then I encourage you all to get involved, click on the link below and tell us what you think.

Click here to complete the questionnaire.

Tagged with:

Comments

This entry is now closed for comments.

  • Comment number 43. Posted by U14399620

    on 28 Mar 2010 22:17

    The BBC 0 emission statement is ,vomit must be pallattable to those with a developed social consence

    • This entry is now closed for comments. Number of positive ratings for comment 43: 0
    • This entry is now closed for comments. Number of negative ratings for comment 43: 0
    Loading…
  • Comment number 42. Posted by liberalminded

    on 28 Mar 2010 19:41

    The BBC is doing a survey on Gay’s Lesbians and Bisexuals and how they are portrayed on the media. This has upset Transgender for reasons I understand but what about Cross Dressers who are stereotyped not only by the majority Heterosexual but by Gay & Lesbians as they to do not consider CD’s one of them like some Heterosexuals do not consider G&L one of them. It is no different, all groups discriminate.
    I think just as much thought and understand is required towards the likes of me and the many like me who have to remain very quiet and confined to their own homes yet the majority of women now wear dress that they argue is traditional men’s wear when arguing against Cross Dressers like me. Some now wear ties, trilbies, rugby style shirts etc and many like me have to accept it in society or be accused of an MCP or even queer. They argue women’s trousers are not traditional male trousers as they are cut for them! Trousers are trousers. I agree with the comment about the halo women, the wonderful human beings always victimised by Heterosexual males on your blog site 28th March 3.40 pm is correct.
    I have not completed the survey as I do not feel qualified to comment with not being that way inclined, the questions limited to GLB’s and do not watch a broad spectrum of TV, usually films, news and documentaries that appeal to my interest. However I have no object to GLB’s or being portrayed as such in the media provided it is done sensibly and tastefully.
    I live in a rural and not too densely populated area and have to witness many women dressing in what is when suited to them men’s traditional dress and behave in ways that men are criticised for, like alcohol drinking, language and behaviour out on the streets. I even know at least 5 who look like men in dress, hair styles, glasses, shoes etc. This is accepted without question. I know one man in our area queried this very low key one day but was soon pounced upon by women nearby and accused of being an MCP etc.
    I am a happily married Heterosexual man. I have no feeling about being a woman but I wear regularly clothing labelled as women’s wear. Not a bra as I have no boobs or false ones. Not a wig as I am not a woman. Not make up as I do not like makeup and apart from mild lipstick, neither does my wife. I wear skirts, and dresses not because I’m weird or odd but because like so many women say when wearing macho shoes, boots, or many items traditionally labelled as menswear when it suits the woman’s argument, because they are comfortable. I find them warmer in the winter and cooler in the summer. They have far more personality and flare than traditional men’s clothing. Clothes are a human invention to keep us warm and feel good. I have felt a lot calmer and less macho feelings whilst wearing skirts and tops. My wife is in full support and agrees with my observations. I know this independently as it was she who detected my feelings in this area when I was enthusiastic to go shopping with her for her even though I had kept my desire quite within me. When she suggested I should have a skirt there was no hesitation. I now have 27 from casual, special occasions and work within the house! All sensible, classy items, mainly M&S items, nothing silly, kinky etc. The majority of women in their pursuit to lose the traditional female image are giving up a great privilege in my view. I’m all for equality in all areas of human life and have been from as long as I could reason but I would also like to take it evenly on both sides in all aspects - my wife and I do that now within our lives and have a very strong and trusting relationship.
    I know one or two Gays who live together and get on well with them within the social community. I have no sexual feelings towards them as I love my wife, but we both get on with them as much as Heterosexual couples. Yes there are bad examples of Gays and Lesbians, but then the majority Heterosexual community are not squeaky clean in this department either. With the exception of my wife, no one knows of these thoughts or connection to me. My wife is frightened simply because on the anti social feelings that would be portrayed.
    Perhaps a survey on Cross Dressers should also be included as we are legitimate members of the public. After all women Cross Dressers can do no wrong.

    • This entry is now closed for comments. Number of positive ratings for comment 42: 0
    • This entry is now closed for comments. Number of negative ratings for comment 42: 0
    Loading…
  • Comment number 41. Posted by kirkcaptain

    on 28 Mar 2010 19:13

    @ lwhi

    Thanks for the link but unlike the reports of heterosexual man alleged rapists who are arrested there is no name, no details of when expected to be in court and whether charged, also in the first report no photofit etc and would have been front page news on many occasions.

    And no doubt if found guilty will not appear on the front page news with a lengthy report and a photo (which normally happens in other cases). nothing. Tt would be interesting to see if we hear any more of the case.

    But here is another example from the US, apparently a homosexual who sexually harasses male collegaues at work is not sufficient to consitute sexual harassment, just another example of the double standards and lack of reporting on those double standards:

    http://www.lexology.com/library/detail.aspx?g=58a435b7-b115-44e0-8168-305930c3a5ed

    USA
    March 10 2010
    Is the Eleventh Circuit Court of Appeals going to reverse its decision in the controversial case of Corbitt v. Home Depot?

    Last August I reported on this decision by the Eleventh Circuit Court of Appeals (which covers Florida, Georgia and Alabama), in which the court analyzed the claims of two former Home Depot employees who claimed their male supervisor repeatedly subjected them to unwanted flirtatious compliments and sexual touchings. The plaintiffs alleged that the supervisor made such comments as "your hair is beautiful," and "I like your green eyes" and touched the plaintiffs in a sexual way on several occasions. He even allegedly told one of the employees, “I know you’re not gay, but you’ve probably thought about it, I could show you how, I know you’ll like it." The court held that under the totality of the circumstances, the supervisor's conduct was not sufficiently severe or pervasive to constitute sexual harassment under Title VII.

    In December the court issued a revised opinion that reached the same result on the plaintiffs' sexual harassment claims.







    • This entry is now closed for comments. Number of positive ratings for comment 41: 0
    • This entry is now closed for comments. Number of negative ratings for comment 41: 0
    Loading…
  • Comment number 40. Posted by lukus

    on 28 Mar 2010 18:53

    @kirkcaptain;

    > and no follow up to the report as to whether the alleged rapist has been caught or
    > charged or not, who he is, and whether there have been any court proceedings.

    And by-the-way, here's the follow up to that report:

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/wear/8582700.stm

    • This entry is now closed for comments. Number of positive ratings for comment 40: 0
    • This entry is now closed for comments. Number of negative ratings for comment 40: 0
    Loading…
  • Comment number 39. Posted by lukus

    on 28 Mar 2010 18:47

    @kirkcaptain;

    > Had a male raped a 16 old girl it would be on front page news of the BBC for days
    > and a massive manhunt. This is just one example which is rife, no assumptions.

    I actually think this _is_ an assumption.

    If you place the term 'raped' into the search bar at the top of this page, you will find many BBC news reports involving rape within the list of search results.

    If you read through some of the reports listed, you'll see the vast majority of reports produced are of a similar length to the example you've referenced.

    Even though most of these crimes were perpetrated by heterosexual men, they didn't feature on the front page of BBC news either.

    • This entry is now closed for comments. Number of positive ratings for comment 39: 0
    • This entry is now closed for comments. Number of negative ratings for comment 39: 0
    Loading…
  • Comment number 38. Posted by kirkcaptain

    on 28 Mar 2010 18:04

    @ lwhiu

    Not my assumptions, just facts. I obviously dont have time to trawl through the BBC's website to show evidence of differing treatment in both the media and the justice system and of course examples of where matters involving females or homosexuals are just not reported at all (even if occasionally reported on in other media) but here is a typical recent example:

    Hidden away in the england section of the news, probably stayed on the site for a couple of hours, and no follow up to the report as to whether the alleged rapist has been caught or charged or not, who he is, and whether there have been any court proceedings.

    Had a male raped a 16 old girl it would be on front page news of the BBC for days and a massive manhunt. This is just one example which is rife, no assumptions.




    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/wear/8574471.stm

    Boy, 16, is raped in Sunderland by a man walking a dog
    A 16-year-old boy was raped in Sunderland by a man who was walking a dog, police said.

    The teenager was walking near Bond Close in the city in the early hours of Tuesday, when he was approached by a man with a German shepherd dog.

    Police said after a brief conversation, the boy was assaulted and raped, before managing to escape.

    The attacker is described as white, 5ft 11in tall, with dark hair and was wearing a blue jacket.

    He was also said to have a local accent.

    Northumbria Police have appealed for witnesses

    • This entry is now closed for comments. Number of positive ratings for comment 38: 0
    • This entry is now closed for comments. Number of negative ratings for comment 38: 0
    Loading…
  • Comment number 37. Posted by lukus

    on 28 Mar 2010 17:41

    @kirkcaptain;

    > Take a look at the BBC news as just one example. An obviously heterosexual male
    > commits a crime or bullies or harms a female or homosexual. It will be front page
    > news of the BBC for days, with headings that seek to demonise the man.

    I honestly don't think that a person's sexuality or gender usually affects the way a crime is reported.

    In terms of news reporting, a story will often revolve around the _crime committed_. As I described earlier, a person's sexuality won't usually be relevant to a news report. You won't know whether the person who committed the crime is heterosexual or homosexual.

    If a person's sexuality isn't mentioned in a news report - the news report isn't demonising heterosexual men. It would be ludicrous to believe otherwise.

    I don't know how you can make the decision that someone is 'obviously heterosexual'. In exactly the same sense, it's very difficult to make a decision that someone is 'obviously homosexual'.

    If gay people were automatically labelled as homosexual when a crime was reported in the news media, this would insinuate that the person's sexuality was a relevant factor in the crime. Homosexuality is not a precursor to criminal behaviour - and it would obviously be wrong to suggest otherwise.

    From you views, it seems that your main concerns revolve around the concept of 'positive discrimination'. I'd agree that someone shouldn't be unfairly advantaged by their sexuality, gender or race - but I also feel that when someone is subjected to adversity on a daily basis, it's worth taking steps to redress the balance. It's a difficult situation, which needs to be considered carefully.

    However, I don't think it's sensible to believe that there's a liberal conspiracy or plot making life easier for people who are traditionally seen as marginalised.

    I think you're making far too many assumptions.

    • This entry is now closed for comments. Number of positive ratings for comment 37: 0
    • This entry is now closed for comments. Number of negative ratings for comment 37: 0
    Loading…
  • Comment number 36. Posted by kirkcaptain

    on 28 Mar 2010 17:05

    Maybe the BBC news repoerts should list the name of the reporter under it together with a brief bio of their political views?

    After all in reporting the news both the political views of the reporter and the organisation, and the BBC is clearly in favouir of radical feminism and homosexual rights, will affect the bias of the reporting and programme making. It is very insidious and devisive and affects all institutions and legal systems, not just in the UK but throughout the West. In my opinion a backlash has been brewing at the injustices being reaped upon heterosexual males and it will not be a healthy situation if this backlash continues to grow. Equality before the law regardless of gender etc, not privilige for a loud vocal campaigning minority who it seems are not satisfied with real equality.

    • This entry is now closed for comments. Number of positive ratings for comment 36: 0
    • This entry is now closed for comments. Number of negative ratings for comment 36: 0
    Loading…
  • Comment number 35. Posted by PhelimMc

    on 28 Mar 2010 17:01

    As someone who came out as gay at 12 but is now ex-gay when will the BBC (or any other media) tell my story. When will the BBC look properly at the science - as opposed to the propaganda show with John Barrowman.

    As to homophobia - this is not a recognised psychiatric term. A phobia is an irrational violent fear. While the gay lobby and secular media (including the media) tries to portray anyone who feels that homosexuality is against their religion (especially Christians), homosexuals can change to become heterosexual (smething Kinsey and Peter Tatchell accept as possible), or that science does not prove homosexuality to be inborn (they are correct) as homophobic people there are very few people who believe this with the violent hatred of homosexuals that this term suggests. The use of the term homophobia suggests anyone who has concerns about homoseuxality are as biggoted as right wing fasicsts. We are not. Proper access to the media would allow us to show our concerns and a proper debate to take place.

    • This entry is now closed for comments. Number of positive ratings for comment 35: 0
    • This entry is now closed for comments. Number of negative ratings for comment 35: 0
    Loading…
  • Comment number 34. Posted by kirkcaptain

    on 28 Mar 2010 16:55

    @ lwhi:

    Take a look at the BBC news as just one example. An obviously heterosexual male commits a crime or bullies or harms a female or homosexual. It will be front page news of the BBC for days, with headings that seek to demonise the man.

    Then take a look at what happens to female or homosexual criminals, bullies etc. They appear on page 52 of the BBC news for about an hour if at all, and always in a very sympathetic way. Then the bias justice system will then give them a lenient penalty or in many cases let them off. This leaves aside fictional programmes, where my comments above stand.

    As for your comment "Unless a person's sexuality is directly relevant to their crime, their sexuality would not - and should not - be reported" well this is my point. Neither should their gender affect HOW such matters are reported, and for reasons stated above it does, females and homosexuals are given priviliged treatment.

    Indeed I would turn round what you have said, my point is that all humans should be treated equally. If so why should someone's gender or sexual orientation give them priviliged treatment in employment, the legal system, the media, and so on, or leave them above criticism or treated as unquestionably always right, because of their gender or sexual orientation. Either their gender or sexual orientation is irrelevant or it is not. You cant have it both ways and discrimminate against male (and sometimes female) heterosexuals in the process.

    • This entry is now closed for comments. Number of positive ratings for comment 34: 0
    • This entry is now closed for comments. Number of negative ratings for comment 34: 0
    Loading…
More comments

More Posts

Previous

Next