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Celebrating the best in diversity and creativity at the CDN Awards 2011

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Mark Thompson Mark Thompson | 15:21 UK time, Wednesday, 7 December 2011

Tameka Epsom, from EastEnders and Cherylee Houston from Coronation Street

Tameka Epsom, from EastEnders and Cherylee Houston from Coronation Street

Last night was a fantastic evening celebrating the best in creativity and diversity at the third annual Creative Diversity Network (CDN) Awards, which took place at MediaCityUK studios in Salford.

As current Chair of the CDN, I was very proud to bring the celebration to Salford, so partners, stakeholders, programme makers and talent could see the impressive site that stands for exactly what the CDN Awards are all about: embracing, celebrating and reflecting diversity - geographic as well as demographic.

Winners of the 2011 CDN Awards

Winners of the 2011 CDN Awards

I want to congratulate again all involved in last night's ceremony which showcased some of the very best in diverse and creative programmes and people. Last night many people came together to pay tribute to the enormous range of artistic and creative talent, innovation, commitment and sheer hard work that has taken place over the last year.

The challenges the BBC is meeting - representation, portrayal, a more diverse workforce - are the same for all members of the CDN, and these winners show how successful we can be as an industry when we embrace diversity. As Chair of the CDN, it was a pleasure to see the fruits of so much hard work.

And the winners are...

Radio Times Drama Award:
Luther (BBC One)

Company of the Year Award:
Endemol

Best Comedy & Entertainment Programme:
Phone Shop (Talkback Thames for Channel 4)

Diversity Innovation Award:
Battlefront (Raw Television for Channel 4)

Best Nations and Regions Portrayal:
Fish Town (Mentorn Media for Sky Atlantic HD)

CDN News Award:
The BBC Journalism Trainee Scheme

Best Breakthrough Talent:
Levi David Addai

Community Initiative
Company Pictures, Skins

Best Factual Programme:
Undercover Care: The Abuse Exposed (Panorama, BBC)

The CDN Fellowship:
Presented to Clive Jones, with a speech by Samir Shah and presentation by Chair of the CDN, Mark Thompson

Mark Thompson is the Director General of the BBC, and current Chair of the CDN

Comments

  • Comment number 1.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • Comment number 2.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • Comment number 3.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • Comment number 4.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • Comment number 5.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • Comment number 6.

    Thank you all for your comments (and congratulations), but discussion around F1 is off-topic on this blog. This post relates to the Creative Diversity Network (CDN) Awards.

    If you want to provide feedback on F1, you can find out how to do so here:

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/helpandfeedback/

  • Comment number 7.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • Comment number 8.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • Comment number 9.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • Comment number 10.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • Comment number 11.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • Comment number 12.

    Congratulations on the creativity and the diversity award.

  • Comment number 13.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • Comment number 14.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • Comment number 15.

    Hi Heather! As Mr. Thompson does not seem to read or comment on his own blog, could you perhaps let him know how angry I am to be described by him today as a "sub-set". This is not very nice at all: it's not my fault I'm poor! I work for the NHS. Anyway, let him know I'm off. I'm saving for a Freesat kit and I'll no longer be a burden to you or him. Thirty years of listening to the World Service, 20 years of preferring the BBC to the commercial lot and he thinks I'm a sub-set. How patronising can you get! I see that the majority of the diversity and creativity awards went to commercial free-to-air broadcasters and it's them I'll be watching from now on.

  • Comment number 16.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • Comment number 17.

    Pathetic BBC censorship. Where has free speech gone. The BBC needs to wake up and realise that it’s attitude towards it’s fee paying customers needs to change.

    Keep on slapping your backs and telling yourselves what a good job your doing. You would be just a small independent TV and Radio Broadcaster without the licence fee tax. Remember we pay your wages and you treat us with total disregard.

    Your awards mean nothing and I take back my congratulations to you.

  • Comment number 18.

    All this user's posts have been removed.Why?

  • Comment number 19.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • Comment number 20.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • Comment number 21.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • Comment number 22.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • Comment number 23.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • Comment number 24.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • Comment number 25.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • Comment number 26.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • Comment number 27.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • Comment number 28.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • Comment number 29.

    Thank you for your continued comments. I am one of the editors of the About the BBC blog (which is why I commented earlier). I wanted to explain why some posts have been removed.

    We have in place a set of House Rules: http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/moderation.shtml and if the comment is off topic, we remove it. This isn't to censor. It's so we can focus the conversation on the topic of the blog post.

    We do have a team that handles feedback and complaints. If you would like to complain about F1 or any other item, you can complain to the BBC here: http://www.bbc.co.uk/complaints/

  • Comment number 30.

    Hi Heather, I'd like to offer genuine gratitude for your response.

    The reason the folk here have resorted to posting on this blog is because the complaints dept. (http://www.bbc.co.uk/complaints/%29 offer such a shockingly poor service. Like countless others I received a generic automated response to my F1 complaint and zero follow up to my response. I'm sure you will agree this is unacceptable.

    Where does one go to complain about the complaints process?

    Similarly, Mr Gallop refuses point blank to engage with those who comment on his blog. Is this acceptable?

    I do agree BBC conversation should be kept on topic, and I don't doubt that all the F1 posters would be happy to do so on the F1 blog's if there was any hope of them receiving anything other than an automated response.

  • Comment number 31.

    Why can't Mr err err umm err err Thompson be bothered to read or reply on his own blog ?

  • Comment number 32.

    @30. Beschy

    I have to agree about the BBC complaints department, they are not diverse or creative with their replies, they simply send out auto-replies, and they now send out auto-replies that state they will respond within 10 working days, which they rarely do, and when you complain about that you just get the same auto-reply again.

    But what can you do? The BBC refuse to engage with viewers who are not 'on-message'.
    They refuse to engage with us because we are a sub-set, soon we'll have to wear identifying badges and made to sit on different seats from the BBC elite.

  • Comment number 33.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • Comment number 34.

    Does any one at the BBC actually read or reply to any of their blogs, come on err aggh Thompson the subset would lake answers?

  • Comment number 35.

    @34.jazzotang

    I think Mark Thompson has been advised not to reply, as there have been quite a few complaints made through the BBC complaints link about his 'choice of phrase'.

  • Comment number 36.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • Comment number 37.

    Congratulations on the creativity and the diversity award.

    @29, It seemed like censorship as most comments from 18-28 were classed as alright for a week or so before being removed, some were also on topic though I guess we agree to disagree on that.

    Most are simply looking for reasoning behind the decisions and answers to some of the questions on Ben Gallop's BBC blog http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/sporteditors/2011/11/bbc_formula_1_an_update.html

    Kind regards, J

  • Comment number 38.

    Hello Heather,

    This isn't going to go away you know, there are a lot very angry people who would actually like to be listened to for once. I realise it isn't your fault, but if I were you I'd strongly advise Mr Thompson to read his own blog or at least let him know that there is a large 'sub-set' of BBC viewers who are extremely annoyed with him and the BBC over their shameful treatment concerning the F1 debacle.

    Of course, if he'd rather continue to play hardball with us then I'm sure deteriorating viewing figures will eventually persuade him to sit up and take note, because that is what is going to happen. It would probably be wise for him to consider this: F1 fans don't only tune in to the BBC to watch their favourite sport...

  • Comment number 39.

    The reason so many comments have been removed is that the BBC doesn't like the diverse range of opinions, the BBC likes viewers to be on message and not show any diversity.

  • Comment number 40.

    Well only the BBC could pay £22 million for the idea of a show they already held the rights to since the 1920s. The Voice = Radio. That yank must have seen you coming as they say there is one born every minute and they all seem to be working in the BBC. What has happened to the art of negotiating. FOM had a concord agreement which prevented Sky getting involved and when Bernie said give me more money as I have to pay for my daughters new homes the beeb rolled over and coughed up. Shame on you! BTW I have an idea for a programme I'll let you buy it for £5 million bargain not even 25% of the Voice cost.

    Remeber there has been a ruling that if you don't watch a TV programme when it goes out live and you pick it up of Iplayer and the like later you don't need to have a licence. You antagonise your paymasters at your peril

  • Comment number 41.

    @40.Dave

    Exactly, the Voice is hardly a diverse or distinct programme. it's just a very expensive copy of commercial TV's karaoke shows that already litter the schedules.

    As for the Concorde, it currently prevents Sky for having exclusive coverage, although Whitmarsh and Parr are trying to change that, as it was Parr in Canada that suggested the BBC approach Sky.

    While Bernie said: "The BBC held all the cards, the BBC got to grips with Sky themselves. I spoke with ITV too, and came up with the same problem as Channel 4 had. We had a contract with the BBC which didn't run out until 2014. My hands were tied, the BBC brought Sky to us with the idea of a joint contract, It was not us (FOM) who made that decision."

    And Norbert Haug also said: "I think you need to see things right, it was BBC taking the decision, the initiative (came) from the BBC.

    The initiative came from the BBC, with the blessings of FOTA's chairman (Whitmarsh), and executive committee member (Parr).

    Whitmarsh went on to say: "There won't be a premium for watching Formula 1 on Sky, and it's better than expected, The BBC will show every grand prix in full, half of them live and half of them deferred, so free-to-air is available to everyone."

    Which turned out not to be true. As there most definitely is a premium payment to watch F1 on Sky, and the BBC are not showing every GP in full etc.

  • Comment number 42.

    Such strong-handed moderation - I'm only sorry that I can't see what had been said. No doubt those comments strayed too far from the knife edge that is staying on topic. Hardly celebrating diversity. So in a bid to stay on topic I'd just like to say - ENDEMOL? Who have given us such classics as 'Golden Balls' and 'Deal or No Deal' and not forgetting the truly creative 'Big Brother' which as we all know is renowned for reinventing itself (as the same old drivel), year on year.

    Walking that knife edge though... I must say that the comments here (and lack of!) have been a great deal more interesting than the original article. Now I'm just holding a sweepstake with myself to see how long it is before comments are closed!

    Exciting! This is more like it, BBC!

  • Comment number 43.

    @42.awittyusername

    You forgot 'Don't Scare the Hare', ... that BBC classic.

    Head of Entertainment at Endemol UK, Nick Mather said: "Don't Scare The Hare is an innovative new format and it's hugely exciting to be making this large-scale studio show for BBC One." ... (and the BBC are paying a fortune for it)

    It was pulled after 6 episodes because it got just 900k viewers.

 

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