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FAQs

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Frenquently Asked Questions

Got a burning question about Blast, the BBC or the Creative Industries? The answer should be below. If not, our expert hosts and fellow creatives are available to discuss your queries on the Blast messageboards.

About Blast

What is BBC Blast?

Blast is the place for teenagers to get creative. It provides access to mentors both online and in free events and workshops across the UK. With opportunities to showcase talent, enter competitions and get exclusive creative experiences such as work experience.

Check out these behind the scenes and how to films made for you by Blast.

Although the website specifically caters for 13 to 19 year olds, the BBC Blast project also runs a variety of work experience schemes for young adults between the ages of 18 to 25, who are just taking their first steps into the creative industries. If you are not aged 13 to 25 and would like to find some more suitable information, you may find the following section helpful.

Keep reading to find out more about Blast.

What ages does Blast cater for?

BBC Blast aims to support you in developing your skills and confidence through engagement in the creative arts. The Blast website has been created in order to provide 13 to 19 year olds with a supportive and creative space where they can collaborate and share ideas with their peers.

The age restriction on this website aims to ensure that young people in this age group feel comfortable sharing their work and that the content uploaded is appropriate for the younger members of our audience.

Although the website specifically caters for 13 to 19 year olds, the BBC Blast project also runs a variety of work experience schemes for young adults between the ages of 18 to 25, who are just taking their first steps into the creative industries. In order to bring about peer to peer learning between our audience members we are keen to allow young people in this age group to upload and share their success stories with the younger members on Blast. This is why we have kept the age restriction on the Blast site to 13 to 25.

If you are not aged 13 to 25 and would like to find some more suitable information, you may find the below BBC sites of interest:

BBC Introducing

Writers Room

Film Network

One Music Studio

BBC Communicate

Video Nation

Play

One Music: Unsigned

Sound Kit 1

Sound Kit 2

Digital Lives

Is Blast on TV?

Blast will be broadcast on BBC 2 later this year. It's a great way to showcase the talent of young people who take part in Blast. Segments have included behind the scenes footage of exciting media events, 'How tos' showing you creative techniques and features highlighting our competition winners, such as the Blast Your Label Webisodes and the BAFTA Screen Skills' short films. Watch this space as dates and times for our next transmission are still to be confirmed.

Can I have some Blast merchandise?

We cannot guarantee that we will be able to send you any Blast merchandise, but if you send us an email we will try to accommodate your needs. The best way to get hold of our Blast branded items is to sign up to a creative workshop via the Blast events page.

How do I sign up for the Blast Newsletter?

Sign up for the latest Blast news! Enter your email address on this page to receive a monthly newsletter with what's new on the site, free workshops and events and top tips on getting creative. You can also unsubscribe via this page as well or click on the link at the bottom of our newsletters.

This is a free service and will be sent to your chosen email address when you subscribe.

The BBC may include information about, or links to relevant content/services that we think might be of interest to you in your monthly update. Of course you will be able to opt out of receiving further updates at any time.

How do I send my feedback to Blast?

Why not send us an email? You can also tell us more about your uploading preferences via the latest Blast survey.

Taking part with Blast

Can the Blast tour visit my area or event?

We'd love to hear your suggestions! Why not send us an email? All locations for the 2010 Blast tour have been chosen, but we can keep your feedback in mind for future events. Take a look at our Blast events pages for details of free workshops in your area.

How do I book onto the workshops?

You can find details and make your bookings via the Blast events page.

The best thing to do other than check the tour schedule online, would be to subscribe to the monthly newsletter which gives details of tour events and any other Blast initiatives and competitions.

What is the Blast Youth Panel and how can I join it?

The Youth Panel is made up of 10 young people across the UK aged 13-19. Panel members are especially selected for their creativity, fresh ideas and most importantly their voice - to speak up and represent the voices of other young people in their region.

Applications for the 2010 Youth Panel have now closed, but you can find out about this and other opportunities via our work experience page.

How do I go about getting a copy of a film I made at an event?

When you attend a workshop during the Blast tour, the workshop leaders will endeavour to upload and tag your work on the Blast website, as well as give you a copy on a USB memory stick. If you don't have your memory stick, you can find highlights from the events in your area on the various Blast events pages.

About the Blast website

I need some inspiration to get creative, do you have any online activities I can do?

Yes! There's lots to do, on Blast and around the BBC website. Check out the following examples for inspiration and see where it will take you:

Learn how to put together a professional moodboard from Fashion Expert, Olaf Parker.

Teach yourself some moves from our Dancepedia series.

Get designing in our Character Studio game.

Learn the basics of beat boxing with Shlomo.

Film maker Mat Whitecross shows you how to create a simple, special effect.

Get feedback on your creative writing on the Blast writing messageboards.

Upload your own work, like this 'How To' by Sophie.

Why has my work not appeared on the Blast showcase?

When you upload your work to the Blast website, it may take a few days to be moderated and posted live. Once your submission is published by our moderators, you should receive a link to your work via our email system. If we are unable to process your work, we will try to send you a message as to why this has happened.

Please make sure that your work doesn't break the BBC House Rules. For example, you cannot include your full name or links to other websites in your submission for safety reasons.

You can also tell us more about your uploading preferences via the latest Blast survey.

How do I upload my work?

You can upload your work here.

When you upload your work to the Blast website, it may take a few days to be moderated and posted live. If your submission is successful, you should receive a link to your work via an automated email system. Please make sure that your work doesn't break the BBC House Rules. For example, you cannot include your full name or links to non BBC websites in your submission.

I’m having problems with my Blast screen name.

We're sorry you've been experiencing some technical difficulties during the relaunch of the new Blast.

If you have already changed your screen name and it still isn't being displayed, this may be because the new name needs to go through our moderation process after being updated, before the new name will appear on your posts and account.

We try to moderate these within 24 hours but due to a high number of visitors, this process can sometimes take a little longer. Please check the next time you log in to see if it is now displaying correctly.

If you continue to experience problems, please get back in touch and we will email you some step by step instructions which might help you with changing your screen name.

If you continue to experience problems, why not send us an email via our contact us page?

Why has the new site changed and what does ‘BETA’ mean?

A BETA version of software is a version in the final stages of development. BETA versions are released to the public or to groups of people so that developers can get feedback before releasing the final version.

It's a very exciting time for us as we have re-designed the Blast website. It's in BETA because we're still making changes. Keep checking back for new releases and click here to send us your comments on this version of the new site.

You may have noticed that we have some new features on the Blast website, such as new messageboards, a new writing upload tool and new games. As part of the ongoing development of Blast, some of the features you were used to may be missing or changed while we get up and running. We can pass on your comments to the relevant team so why not send us your feedback about the new site? We hope you continue to enjoy Blast.

I’ve spotted a technical problem with the website, what should I do?

We're sorry if you've been experiencing problems during the development of the new Blast website. We are currently working to resolve these issues, so please keep checking the site every week.

Blast has had a makeover and unfortunately, a few teething problems are inevitable.

If you do spot any technical errors with the site, we would be very grateful if you could let us know as soon as possible.

How do I get to the message boards?

You can discuss all things creative with other Blast members and mentors on the BBC Blast message boards. You will need to register and sign in to post comments.

Or have a look at other areas on the Blast site which might be of use. Make sure you sign up to the Blast Newsletter which keeps you up to date with Blast Events and how to get involved.

Why can't I see any video?

Do you live outside of the UK? Unfortunately BBC content isn't generally available outside of the UK due to the fact that we are funded by TV Licence fee payers in the UK.

If you are based in the UK and are still experiencing problems, you should find the advice on the BBC iPlayer website helpful.

If you are based in the UK and still cannot view our online video content, please email us the location of the content you are trying to view and we will investigate the problem.

Your careers in the creative industries

I want to work in media, do you have any advice?

Getting into media is pretty difficult. There's lots of competition and it can be a matter of luck as well as ability. You may find that a relevant course, such as a university or drama school degree, will help you obtain the skills and confidence to seek a career in the creative industries. There's a wealth of information available on the internet, on the BBC website and particularly on Blast, which can help you pursue creativity as either a career or as a hobby.

Our advice for anyone wanting to work in media would be to get as many qualifications as possible. Broadcasting, for example, is a very difficult and precarious career. If you have exam passes and qualifications, you always have something to fall back on.

Many newcomers start out in low paid, low ranking jobs and have to work very hard to stand out from the vast competition. It's important to speak to media professionals, piers and mentors while looking into your career options, as the media industry is extremely competitive and it can be helpful to get advice from different sources.

Have you thought about posting your question on the Blast messageboards? Our expert hosts may be able to answer your query or there may be some old discussions which you might find helpful. You can register to post messages and be able to upload your creative work for other people to enjoy or you can read other messages without registering.

Check out the answers below for more tailored advice.

Can you give me advice on how to pursue a career in Dance or Drama?

If you would like some advice on how to be a dancer, actor or presenter, you can visit the following pages for some tips:

Blast Dance and Drama category page.

Get into Character with Miriam Margolyes

Dancepedia

BBC Jobs

BBC New Talent

Behind the scenes of Blast's TV advert

We do not usually publish auditions on the BBC website. When a BBC show is cast, the Casting Director speaks directly to a multitude of Agents and Agencies. The Agencies then put actors and actresses forward for specific parts. So if you're interested in acting or presenting, your best bet is to find yourself a reputable agent and ask them to put you forward for auditions.

We do not supply listings of agents or agencies. You could try looking in your local yellow pages or contacting your local stage schools or drama group and ask them for advice.

Another tip is to practice speaking in public to help build up your confidence. Working as a hospital DJ is a good example. Remember - practice makes perfect! How about getting together with some friends and perhaps putting on a play? Or joining a local theatre or dance class? Or maybe you could have a go at filming your own show reel or making a short film?

In order to demonstrate your skills to the people or production companies that work within these fields you may need a show reel to show off your creative abilities. Many companies look for people with raw talent and passion which can count just as much as qualifications and experience. A show reel should not only demonstrate creativity, but also attention to detail. It might include, for example, short clips of you acting in a film, presenting to camera, voice over excerpts or reporting on an event. Be creative and show off as many of your skills as possible. Perhaps your friends could help you out with this.

You may also find that a course, such as a university or Drama School degree in Theatre or Film and TV, will help you obtain the skills and confidence to seek a career in the creative industries. Many newcomers start out in low paid, low ranking jobs and have to work very hard to stand out from the vast competition. We recommend that you speak to as many experts/ tutors in media as possible to help you decide on which options are right for you.

Why not get creative and upload some new work, such as a performance piece? Check out what Blast and other young creatives have been doing for inspiration.

Check that your entry complies with the BBC Blast House Rules.

Can you give me advice on how to pursue a career in Film and TV?

You may want to look for a work experience placement with a TV or Film company you are interested in. It's a great way to find out about different roles in media and may help you find the right path to your chosen career. A search engine may help you find opportunities at your local TV production company.

Information about Blast and BBC placements can be found via the below BBC Jobs page. Please note that there are age restrictions and closing dates for applications.

Why not upload some work to Blast for others to enjoy and rate?

You could also try submitting your work to film festivals, as this is a great way to get feedback and can offer you great networking opportunities.

Check out these behind the scenes films made for you by Blast and the Blast Film category page.

Can you give me advice on how to pursue a career in music?

Remember - practice makes perfect! How about getting together with some friends to write some music? Or joining a band? Or maybe you could have a go at filming your own performance or making a music video?

In order to demonstrate your skills to the people or production companies that work within these fields you may need a demo tape to show off your creative abilities. Many companies look for people with raw talent and passion which can count just as much as qualifications and experience. A demo tape should not only demonstrate creativity, but also attention to detail. It might include examples of your compositions as well as performance. Be creative and show off as many of your skills as possible. Perhaps your friends could help you out with this.

If you would like some advice on all things music related, you can visit the following pages for some tips:

Blast Music and Audio category page.

BBC Sing

BBC Jobs

BBC New Talent

BBC Introducing

BBC Arts Soundkit 1

BBC Arts Soundkit 2

Can you give me advice on how to pursue a career in gaming?

The Blast Games section has been relaunched and we now have 2 new games! More features coming soon. You can also chat to other like-minded gamers on our new look Games messageboard, where you can put your questions to our expert hosts too. How about uploading a photo of your games designs or a video of your characters?

For more advice check out the Blast Games category page.

Can you give me advice on how to pursue a career in art?

Although art is a broad subject, encompassing a varied array of disciplines, uses and platforms, many feel that earning a living from it can be tricky. But this doesn’t have to be the case. If you want to be an artist, you have to be willing to develop the 3 qualities essential for success: creativity, business skills and perseverance. There are many ways to forge a career in the art industry. With a global share of 26%, the UK has by far the largest art and antiques market in Europe and is second only to the USA in the world. Some reports suggest the UK art market is worth £3,467 million. There are more roles in this arena than you might think and they can be broken down into the following categories:

Art Directors: They develop design ideas for media projects and manage production.

Craft Artists: They hand-make items to sell or exhibit, such as jewellery, candles, needlework, linens and pottery.

Fine Artists: They create paintings, sculpture and illustrations for exhibitions, sale or licensing.

Multimedia Artists: They create and manipulate images for film, video, websites etc.

Then there are also the careers which surround the art world, such as buyers, gallery curators, historians, reviewers and models.

Whichever area of the art industry you are interested in; your journey will probably start with education. Studying art at school or college is a great way of learning useful techniques, in a non intimidating environment and the classes will give you time and motivation to develop your own personal skills and style. Joining an art class, such as life drawing or textiles, in your spare time can be great too. It's also a fantastic way to meet like minded people to join you on those inspirational trips to galleries! There are lots of great art books and other resources out there and soaking up the history, analysis and inspiration of others can really help shape your own work.

However, it is lucky for you that art is one of the few professions where you can participate without any training and with very few materials. This is because most artists work alone and because art is subjective and expressive and not an exact science. We like what we like and beauty is in the eye of the beholder so don't be put off if you are unable to pay for some training. In some rare cases, even messy paintings by 8 year olds can sell for thousands! A buyer will usually seek out work which makes them feel something, rather than for its technical brilliance.

Artists need exposure in order to sell their art. Traditionally, this has been done by exhibiting at galleries, restaurants, cafes and online. Social networking and other marketing tools can play a big part in you making a name for yourself and a career out of your talent. Certain subject matters are more marketable than others. That's why keeping a good business head and creating a strong business plan will really aid you.

As mentioned above, roles in the art world can vary and it is worth doing some research to find out what interests you and where to start. One little known career is in Art Licensing. Art Licensing refers to the use of artwork for a secondary purpose. It can be really lucrative and is also a great way of raising your profile. If you can create a collection of work, such as 4 paintings of landscapes or iconic movie stars, then commercial companies might be interested in buying permission to use them. In our everyday lives we are surrounded by products, many of which carry images on them. Greetings cards, mugs, mouse mats, T shirts, bags, canvas prints, and cushions can carry images created by an artist who has given permission for the companies to use them for a fee. Established licensing agencies exist to help artists find good deals for their artwork, in exchange for a proportion of the profits, but if you’re prepared to do the leg work and are careful you can have a go at doing this yourself. There are also annual events which help artists exhibit and strike deals, although there can be fees for renting booths. It would be a good idea to talk to other artists, or get specialist legal help, before committing yourself to signing anything. We would also advise that you speak to a careers adviser before you plan your career path.

You may also want to look for a work experience placement within an area of the art industry you are interested in. It's a great way to find out about different roles and may help you find the right path to your chosen career. A search engine should help you find opportunities at your local design company, art shop or gallery. It could be a great insight into the industry and it's never too early to get a ahead start! Perhaps there is an art teacher in your school or college who could push you in the right direction?

Information about Blast and BBC placements can be found via the BBC Jobs page. Please note that there are age restrictions and closing dates for applications.

Why not upload some work to Blast for others to enjoy and rate?

You should also keep a sketch book going. Collect, collate and draw whatever inspires you. You should go out and observe nature and people, experiment with materials and techniques. Check out galleries, museums, parks, the high street, collect inspiration from things you see during a holiday.

Why not set yourself an art challenge? You could recreate a classic painting and insert yourself into the picture. You could raise money for charity by drawing portraits at a summer fair. Or experiment by capturing the same subject in different styles such as manga, graffiti, African, cubism and collage. Or you could save some money by making art as gifts for friends.

You can discuss all things creative with other Blast members and mentors on the BBC Blast message boards.

Check out the Blast art category page for inspiration.

Can you give me advice on how to pursue a career in fashion?

You may want to look for a work experience placement within an area of the fashion industry you are interested in. It's a great way to find out about different roles, especially in the lead up to London Fashion Week in mid February and late September, and it should help you find the right path to your chosen career. A search engine may help you find opportunities at your local design company, fashion shop or magazine. You could write to a department store asking to shadow one of the designers. Typical experience you might gain includes organising clothes and accessories, researching upcoming trends, sourcing fabric and learning decoration techniques. It could be a great insight into the industry and it's never too early to get a head start! One thing we would recommend is perhaps trying to get yourself a part time job in a fashion shop that has a head office. This can be a great way of getting some direct contact with the brand so you can get a good placement. Or perhaps there is a textiles teacher in your school or college who could push you in the right direction? The best thing to do is call up the tailors in your area and ask them if you could shadow them, explaining how you love designing and want to find out more.

Information about Blast and BBC placements can be found via the BBC Jobs page. Please note that there are age restrictions and closing dates for applications.

Make sure you have a clear and well organised CV which demonstrates your experience, creativity and personality. Make a list of designers you like, find out their email addresses from their website or the London Fashion Week site and email them an enthusiastic cover letter and CV. Include some interesting, clear images of your work. Explain why you like their designs and why you want to shadow them. Another great place to find opportunities is via social networking sites. Its often not what you know but who you know!

Julian Roberts, our expert fashion host says, "By doing a placement, its shows you the other side of the industry. How things work, processes, fabric sourcing, finishes, contacts. They are really useful, they focused me and showed me what I need to achieve to get to where I want to be! Nowadays, design companies RELY on unpaid work placements, and now that there are so many more people passing through college and university than ever before, there is a steady supply of people willing to work for nothing to get a foot on the ladder. This is a shame, ethically all workers should be paid something, but it's the reality of how the industry now functions. So prepare for the competition! As there are so many people seeking work experience, you have to make sure you get seen/heard."

"A punchy, visual CV is good. You might need to send a few, don't stop at just one. Research who personally works at the company you want to work at. Try to reach them directly. Most importantly, be super polite, be excited about it, make your CV and covering letter unique, try to stand out (not crazily, just creatively), and don't be put off by rejection or no reply."

"Yep, making tea and coffee is an ARTFORM they should teach at college! If someone came to my flat or studio then I would offer them a cup of tea and make them feel looked after. Similarly it's really important you do the same at work or on work experience."

"Also, it's important to work hard. I've had a lot of people come to do placements with me who are just lazy and have to be told what to do all the time. If I have to chase after someone telling them what to do all the time then it becomes a full time job looking after my assistants, and that results in me having to let them go! I need the people who work for me to be like my shadow, fully engaged in the work i do, following my movements, and anticipating what comes next. This is how I learned when I was on placement. The designers i worked with didn't need to ask me for things like rulers, scissors, sketches because I was already there offering them to them, because I knew they needed them next. So, don't wait to be told all the time, show some initiative, be eager to learn, don't be frightened to ask how things are done or take on something new."

"And enjoy it as much as you can. Some placements will be good, some will be less good. But even bad placements teach you something about how the industry works. Some of the best placements were the worst ones! They taught me what NOT to do, and how NOT to be when setting up my own studio."

Jerry, our expert marketing graduate host says, "The hardest thing about doing a CV is not having anything to put on if you haven't yet had a job or any experience. I was very lucky that I got my first placement through a friend. Really to list anything that you have done or any skills you have that would make you a good intern is the most important thing".

You should also keep a fashion scrapbook going. You should go out and find patterns and fabrics, go window shopping, analyse clothes you are drawn to, how they are put together, the stitches and seams that have been applied. Collect, collate and draw whatever inspires you. Check out galleries, museums, parks, the high street, collect inspiration from things you see during a holiday.

Why not set yourself a fashion challenge? Create a new wardrobe for next term or for any events that are coming up. Experiment with making fashion gifts for friends.

Check out these Blast fashion how tos and the Blast Fashion category page for inspiration.

Track the progress of our Your Label competition winners.

Why not upload some work to Blast for others to enjoy and rate?

Our expert hosts and fellow creatives are keen to discuss fashion with you on the Blast mesageboards.

Can you give me advice on how to pursue a career in Writing?

Blast has a lively writing section including the Blast writing message boards where our expert hosts are ready and keen to discuss your options. Many other young people have posted or uploaded their stories, poems and scripts to get valuable feedback from peers and mentors. You can register to post, comment and upload or just browse through the threads to soak up the existing advice.

Our advice to budding writers obviously varies depending on which type of writing you are interested in.

For example, if you want to be a script writer, the best place to send your script is to BBC Writers Room, as they are committed to nurturing writers on behalf of the BBC and have helped other writers to be commissioned for programmes ranging from EastEnders and BBC Films to Torchwood.

All the information you will need to submit your script to BBC Writers Room can be found on this site, including how to format your script and what the BBC are looking for in a new series. Simply click on the genre that suites your idea and all the information you need should be there. The address to send your script to can be found in the Sending scripts to the BBC section.

BBC Writers Room sift unsolicited scripts by reading the first ten pages. All eligible scripts are considered in this way. If a script hooks their attention, it will then be given a full read and the writer will receive feedback. If a script does not make it past the sift stage, then unfortunately it will be returned to the writer without feedback. Writers Room have provided a handy checklist.

Or you may prefer to tailor your script to one of these oportunities.

Check out the Blast Writing category page for tips on other writing disciplines.

It takes most writers a few tries before they finally create a 'hit'. So if you don't succeed first time around, be persistent and take all feedback on board. Remember, the fact you've written something is an achievement in itself.

Good luck and let us know how it goes!

How do I send my script or idea to the BBC?

All proposals for BBC content must go through BBC e-commissioning. This might be the best place to submit your idea, depending on what kind of idea it is. Or it might give you some inspiration for new ideas or other places to look.

The BBC is not involved in commercial activity, so if you wanted to help make a commercial product, such as a video game to be sold on the high street, then this sort of thing is handled by BBC Worldwide and not BBC.

The best place to send your script is to BBC Writers Room, as they are committed to nurturing writers on behalf of the BBC and have helped other writers to be commissioned for programmes ranging from EastEnders and BBC Films to Torchwood.

All the information you will need to submit your script to BBC Writers Room can be found on this site, including how to format your script and what the BBC are looking for in a new series. Simply click on the genre that suites your idea and all the information you need should be there. The address to send your script to can be found in the Sending scripts to the BBC section.

Or you may prefer to tailor your script to one of these oportunities.

We also advise that you post your questions on the BBC Blast messageboards, as our expert hosts and fellow users may be able to give you some useful tips.

How do I apply for jobs at the BBC?

Information about the Blast placements and most BBC jobs can be found via the BBC Jobs page and all applications must be done through BBC Jobs using the online booking form.

What roles are there in media and how do people get into it?

There are hundreds of jobs across the creative industries and BBC Blast has gone behind the scenes to give you the inside scoop. Check out Skillset as well, as there are sure to be some roles you may never have even considered as a possible career option. There also loads of links on this BBC Jobs page.

What courses would you recommend?

It really depends what subjects you are passionate about. This site should give you an insight into what it's like to work in the creative industries. We would also encourage you to discuss your options on the Blast messageboards, as our expert hosts are keen to help. The Student Life site should be able to advise you about careers in more academic areas. It's important to discuss your ambitions with a school careers adviser or teacher, as decisions about your future need to be considered carefully.

How can I make my own film or movie?

There's lots of advice on the Blast and BBC website to help you get started in film making. Here are some ideas you might find of use:

Behind the scenes and How to films made by Blast.

Free film making workshops.

Advice from peers and expert hosts on the Blast messageboards.

Film Network.

Me and My Movie.

Writers Room.

Make sure you upload it to Blast!

About the BBC

Find out how the BBC operates

BBC Connect is your guide to understanding, using and creating media.

What happens when I contact the BBC?

We aim to answer your queries within 10 days. However, the BBC receives an over whelming amount of emails each week so there may be some delay in us getting back to you. We value your feedback and will make sure your message reaches the relevant BBC team.

How do I complain to the BBC?

We are very keen to hear your comments and take complaints very seriously. Why not send us an email via our contact us page?

We aim to answer your queries within 10 days. However, the BBC receives an over whelming amount of emails each week so there may be some delay in us getting back to you. We value your feedback and will make sure your message reaches the relevant BBC team.

Can I come to the BBC for a tour of the studios?

Yes, we'd love to welcome you at one of the many BBC buildings! Take a behind-the-scenes tour of the most famous broadcaster in the world. There's lots of tours to choose from, so whether you're interested in radio, CBBC or television history, there's plenty to make your trip a great day out!

Where can I buy BBC DVDs?

Unfortunately we are unable to make suggestions as the BBC is usually not allowed to recommend one website or shop over another. Any relevant high street shop, website or search engine should be able to help.

You could also a look at the BBC Worldwide website for more information about BBC branding and the BBC Worldwide Home Entertainment business.

How do I apply to be on a show?

All Blast opportunities are advertised on the competitions and work experience pages.

When a show is taking on new contestants, it will often be advertised on the Be on a Show page. If your favourite show is not listed it means they are not currently looking for anyone to take part. Why not try out for one of the other shows that are looking for contestants?

Unfortunately, we don’t know in advance when any particular show will be looking for contestants and due to the large number of applications our shows receive, we are unable to let anyone know individually when a show will be looking for anyone to take part. So please keep checking the site or watch for when they advertise on television.

You can find out more about how children are selected to take part in shows in this You on CBBC video.

If you are interested in obtaining tickets to a live studio show at the BBC then the following information should be of use to you.

Programmes for children normally arrange their own audiences, as each one has different criteria. Some shows get audiences from contestants’ schools and often, there are age restrictions because of safety regulations.

The best thing to do is to write directly to the programme you are interested in and ask if they need audience members. You could also ask for an audience application form. The address for all programmes is:

"Programme Name", BBC Television Centre, Wood Lane, London W12 7RJ

You can also find tickets to shows by using a search engine.

Help for teachers and organisations

Can you advertise our event or mention our project or website on Blast?

Unfortunately it is sometimes difficult for the BBC to get involved with marketing external organisations. However, it may still be a good idea for you to get in touch with us regarding any relevant future collaborative opportunities.

The best thing to do is to sign up to the Blast Newsletter.

I am a teacher and I would like to find out what class resources Blast has on offer.

Here are some resources you might find useful:

Hip Hop Shakespeare Quiz

Blast Teachers page

Can you make a donation to our charity fundraising?

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