Bitesize has changed! We're updating subjects as fast as we can. Visit our new site to find Bitesize guides and clips - and tell us what you think!

Did you know?

We also have Bitesize study guides covering many subjects at National 4 and National 5 on our Knowledge & Learning BETA website.

Home > Maths I > About the exam > About the exam

Maths I

About the exam

Credit - questions in context

The paper usually begins with one or two questions which are routine non-calculator question like the examples given in the table above.

From question two or three onwards, non-calculator skills may be assessed in the context of a problem. Examples of non calculator skills being tested in the context of a problem are shown below.

Example - 2010 exam, Question 5

Question

A bag contains 27 marbles. Some are black and some are white.

The probability that a marble chosen at random is black is\frac{4}{9}.

  • a) What is the probability that a marble chosen at random is white?
  • b) How many white marbles are in the bag?
Answer

This question requires you to carry out the following calculation without a calculator in part (b)

\frac{5}{9}of 27 = 15

Example - 2010 exam, Question 6

Question

Cleano washing powder is on special offer.

Each box on special offer contains 20% more powder than the standard box.

A box on special offer contains 900 grams of powder.

How many grams of powder does the standard box contain?

Answer

This question requires you to carry out the following calculation without a calculator.

120% = 900g

20% = 900 ÷ 6 = 150g

100% = 150 x 5 = 750g

Note – This is NOT the only way to solve this problem

Example - 2009 exam, Question 3

Question

Given that f(x)=x2 + 3

  • a) evaluate f(-4)
  • b) find t when f(t) = 52
Answer

This question requires you to carry out the following calculation without a calculator in part a).

(-4)2 + 3

= 16 + 3

= 19

Play

A picture of Mia Cadaver

Tombstone Timeout

Swot up your sums with Mia Cadaver's maths game

BBC © 2014 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.