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Home > Geography > International issues > Factors influencing development

Geography

Factors influencing development

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LEDCs face many difficulties and obstacles as they struggle to improve the conditions of their citizens. Many solutions have been proposed, with varying degrees of success, but poverty is still a daily reality for millions of people.

The gap between rich and poor

 

Calcutta street scene

 

Factors that affect the economic gap between MEDCs and LEDCs.

  1. Political factors such as the regime, colonial influences that will influence trading links, and relationships with other countries. The current political regime in Zimbabwe under Robert Mugabe is a major factor contributing to the low level of development.
  2. The natural environment such as susceptibility to floods, drought and other hazards can influence development, eg frequent drought in the Sahel region of Africa is one of the obstacles to development in these countries.
  3. Economic activity such as wealth generated through industry, agriculture or availability of natural resources influences development. The UK is one of the most developed nations due to these factors, which allowed it to industrialise during the Industrial Revolution.
  4. Debt – many LEDCs are in debt to MEDCs, which means they have to prioritise paying these off with interest before investing in development.
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