Bitesize has changed! We're updating subjects as fast as we can. Visit our new site to find Bitesize guides and clips - and tell us what you think!

Did you know?

We also have Bitesize study guides covering many subjects at National 4 and National 5 on our Knowledge & Learning BETA website.

Geography

Aid

Back

Many MEDCs will make allowance in their domestic budgets to provide aid to LEDCs. This aid may be given as part of a planned process or as a response to a emergency. Many charities also exist to provide aid to LEDCs.

Types of aid

 

In order to see this content you need to have both Javascript enabled and Flash installed.

 

Aid is help given, often from one country to another.

There are however many different types of aid:

  1. Bilateral aid - from one country to another
  2. Multilateral aid - from international organisations which receive money from several countries e.g. United Nations, the World Bank
  3. Emergency or short-term aid – food or medical help to give short term relief. Needed after a disaster such as the 2000 Mozambique floods or the 2004 Asian tsunami.
  4. Conditional or tied aid – when one country donates money or resources to another (bilateral aid) but with conditions attached which will often be in the MEDCs [MEDC: A More Economically Developed Country [MEDC] has high levels of development, based on economic indicators, such as gross domestic product (the country's income). More of the countries in the northern hemisphere are MEDCs, eg UK, USA, Canada, Europe. More of the countries in the southern hemisphere are Less Economically Developed Countries [LEDCs]. favour, e.g the aid has to be used for buying goods from the donor country. An example of tied aid is the controversial Pergau Dam project in Malaysia.
  5. Charitable aid – funded by donations from the public through organisations such as OXFAM.
  6. Voluntary aid - charities e.g. Oxfam
  7. Project aid - aid given for specific projects e.g. HEP station [Hydroelectric Power: HEP is an abbreviation of hydroelectric power.
  8. Long term or development aid – this is usually a project involving local communities in education and skills for sustainable development, through organisations such as Practical Action.

International aid can solve some short term problems. However it can also create problems. For example, in times of famine, food is imported cheaply and so the farmers receive very little money for the crops that have survived. Therefore many countries are introducing self-help schemes.

 

Click the audio for a radio debate about foreign aid.

In order to see this content you need to have both Javascript enabled and Flash installed.

Back

Watch

A baby being held.

Class Clips

The roles and work of the UN aid agencies

Watch

Two people standing in the sun

Class Clips

Video clip about the need for aid in parts of Africa suffering war and famine

Watch

Man

Class Clips

Video clip about a self-help scheme in Tanzania teaching farming skills

BBC © 2014 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.