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Home > English > Writing > Discursive writing

English

Discursive writing

Planning a discursive essay

The following basic structure should be employed for writing this essay.

  • Provide an interesting introduction.
  • Provide a clear indication of your position, your stance in relation to the topic (are you 'for' or 'against' ?).
  • Present your first argument, with supporting evidence.
  • Present your second argument, with supporting evidence.
  • Present your third argument, with supporting evidence.
  • Present your fourth argument, with supporting evidence, and so on (the number of paragraphs like this will depend on the number of arguments you can offer).
  • Indicate, in a single paragraph, that there is another side to this argument, with some idea of the points likely to be made for the view(s) which are opposite to your own.
  • Reiterate (state again) your position and conclude your essay.

This plan is followed in the exemplar essay provided in this revision bite.

 

Listen to this audio clip about presenting a balanced argument.

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