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Colin Evans

You are in: Berkshire > Local radio > Colin Evans > Colin Evans

Tulips

Time to start planting your tulips.

Colin Evans

Despite the November rain, Colin has been hard at work in the garden planting thousands of bulbs this week and trying to outfox the pesky squirrels who enjoy digging them up! Colin says that he will "not be beaten" by the weather.

I can't believe how fast November is going. It only seems a short while ago we were moaning about what a bad summer gardening wise this year has been.

Tulips

Tulips

Already I have spent many hours in my garden planting what must be at least three thousand bulbs.

I just can't wait for spring to arrive to see just how many of these wonderful spring flowers the squirrels have taken.

Squirrels foxed

I am confident though that I have foxed them this year as I have made sure each bulb has been planted well down, at least three times their own depth and in some cases lower.

Squirrel with a nut.

Squirrel

That and a good application of thick garden compost should throw them off the scent.

The lawn could do with a trim but I have not managed to get out and do it so far as the ground is just too wet. Dead leaves are proving to be a real pain to clear away, especially with the wet weather we have been having over the past week.

Still, when the ground dries out I can get on with my favourite job in the garden, cutting the lawn.

Child playing in the autumn leaves

Autumn leaves are thick on the ground.

Lawn care

"Is he mad?" I hear you say. But we shouldn't put our mowers away now if we want to get the best from our gardens at this time of year.

A clipped lawn will improve the overall look of the garden. And if you trim off the edges it will make it look even better.

Colin's plant of the week

As for me, I just love getting out there and showing the elements I will not be beaten. And contrary to popular belief, you can cut the lawn right through the year as long as it's not too wet or frosted, just keep the cutter bars a bit higher.

Cordyline is perhaps one of the best plants to use as a specimen and one which will make a huge impact.

Planted in the open or as pot grown specimens very few other plants can make a splash of colour like a Cordyline. Whilst they look very exotic with their colourful leaves they are pretty hardy, they just do not like being too wet. My favourite varieties are "Sundance" which are perfect for the patio with their green and red stems and "Sparkler" with more delicate green, silver and pink leaves making a great show either in the open ground or in a potted display.

Topical Tips:

Buy curly kale and broccoli plants from the garden centre and plant them straight into the open ground. Even if the soil is wet it does not matter as these hardy brassicas will be happy to root in these conditions now. Feed with nitrogen once they are planted and they will make rapid growth. If you can keep them disease free then you could well be harvesting then in  February.

Take geranium and pelargonium cuttings and place them in a cool dry frost free and light place. Make sure the cuttings are never over watered, in fact, keeping them very much on the dry side in view is better and if you keep an eye on insect pests like white fly which can still attack at this time of the year then you will have plenty of healthy plants to put into tubs and borders in the spring.

Onions and garlic bulbs can be obtained at the garden centres and provided you can plant then into a  dry soil then they will make some growth before the winter gets well set in.

Happy Gardening.

last updated: 17/11/2008 at 11:50
created: 17/11/2008

You are in: Berkshire > Local radio > Colin Evans > Colin Evans

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