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You are in: Berkshire > Blast > Contemporary Art comes to Berkshire

The River Thames at Maidenhead by Annick McKenzie

The River Thames at Maidenhead by Annick

Contemporary Art comes to Berkshire

With the fourth annual Windsor Contemporary Arts Fair just around the corner, we got in touch with Berkshire based artist Annick McKenzie to find out why the fair is worth a visit…

Windsor Racecourse plays host to the fourth Windsor Contemporary Arts Fair this November, with contributions from over 75 artists.

Painters, printmakers, photographers, sculptors and ceramicists alike are all exhibiting their work over three days.

One of the artists exhibiting at this year’s fair is Annick McKenzie: born in France, Annick is now based in Taplow

Annick McKenzie

Annick McKenzie

Having exhibited at last year’s fair, Annick spoke of her experience at the event: “I found it really wonderful. It was very well run and it was very well supported by the public. The organisers worked very hard and they still do”.

For the artists, it is vital to have the opportunity to interact with the public. “You don’t always sell because there are so many people, but for me, it is the interaction you have with people which is really important.

"People have the opportunity not only see the painting for real, but to actually meet the artist.  It is not always like that obviously in a gallery or a museum”.

But the fair is not only beneficial for the artists. “When people buy something they can ask the artist, ‘why did you paint it like that?’.

"It gives a different dimension to the art, rather than just putting on their wall.  It can attract them to buy the painting in the first place.”

"Many people will come and discover something that they fall in love with."

Annick McKenzie

The fair combines the work of both emerging and established artists providing a great variety of exhibits.

 “There is something for everybody, definitely. Obviously you have to be an art lover, but people will go there because they have never been to an art exhibition and because they want to support something that is happening in their area.

"Last year, many people brought their kids along to introduce them to art. Some people go because they know which artists will be there and will definitely buy a piece of art on the spot, but many people will come and discover something that they fall in love with.”

So how does an artist prepare for an exhibition?

“I don’t have a particular ‘theme’ but I do know how many paintings I am going to do and what size they will be, which depends on the stand.

"Sometimes a painting takes a week, sometimes a couple of days. It’s difficult because I don’t feel like painting every day.

"It’s good to have a goal like an exhibition. It gives me a push to create. For this year's fair it will be all brand new work.”

Workshop at last year's fair

Getting involved at last year's fair.

Annick’s work centre’s around her passion for colour. “I have always been interested in colour: it touches me.

"When I started to paint I always used very bright colours and I wasn’t always thinking ‘this colour and this colour will go well together’. If I started to think like that it wouldn’t be spontaneous.

"There’s a harmony to it. I think it’s always been there and I’ve been very lucky to be able to express it.

“The fair is very good for the whole area”, says Annick. At four years old, Windsor’s Contemporary Art Fair is relatively young.

 “Most of the fairs are in London or other big cities, such as Bristol and Brighton. Windsor is not as big as Brighton, but it will become so, I’m sure.”

For information on the fair:

For more on this artist:

last updated: 27/08/2008 at 14:55
created: 27/08/2008

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