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Tibbie Fowler


Tibbie Fowler o' the glen, There's o'er mony wooin at ther, Tibbie Fowler o' the glen, There's o'er mony wooin at her. Wooin at her, pu'in at her, Courtin at her, canna get her: Filthy elf, it's for her pelf, That a' the lads are wooin at her. Ten cam east, and ten cam west, Ten came rowin o'er the water; Twa came down the lang dyke side, There's twa and thirty wooin at her. There's seven but, and seven ben, Seven in the pantry wi' her; Twenty head about the door, There's ane and forty wooin at her. She's got pendles in her lugs, Cockle-shells wad set her better; High-heel'd shoon and siller tags, And a' the lads are wooin at her. Be a lassie e'er sae black, An she hae the name o' siller, Set her upo' Tintock-tap, The wind will blaw a man till her. Be a lassie e'er sae fair, An she want the pennie siller; A lie may fell her in the air, Before a man be even till her. Wooin at her, pu'in at her, Courtin at her, canna get her: Filthy elf, it's for her pelf, That a' the lads are wooin at her.

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Denis Lawson

About this work

This is a song by Robert Burns. It was written in 1796 and is read here by Denis Lawson.

More about this song

'Tibbie Fowler' is Burns's version of a traditional song. It was collected and amended by the poet for inclusion in James Johnson's Scots Musical Museum where it appeared in 1796.

Songs which address the importance of wealth ('pelf') in eighteenth-century courtships and marriages are common in folk culture.

Pauline Mackay

Themes for this song

woman seduction marriage

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