Contains some scenes of a sexual nature

There's news lasses news


There's news, lasses, news, Gude news I've to tell, There's a boatfu' o' lads Come to our town to sell. The wean wants a cradle, An' the cradle wants a cod, An' I'll no gang to my bed, Until I get a nod. Father, quo' she, Mither, quo she, Do what you can, I'll no gang to my bed, Till I get a man. The wean wants a cradle, An' the cradle wants a cod, An' I'll no gang to my bed, Until I get a nod. I hae as gude a craft rig As made o' yird and stane; And waly fa' the ley-crap, For I maun till't again. The wean wants a cradle, An' the cradle wants a cod, An' I'll no gang to my bed, Until I get a nod.

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Annette Crosbie

About this work

This is a song by Robert Burns. It was written in 1795 and is read here by Annette Crosbie.

More about this song

It is thought that 'There's news lasses news' is Burns's version of a traditional folk song. Burns prepared these verses for inclusion in James Johnson's Scots Musical Museum, where they were eventually published in 1803.

Here a young woman anticipates the arrival of potential suitors to her town and makes it clear that she seeks both marriage and sexual pleasure. The depiction of sexually desirous women is a common feature of eighteenth-century folk song.

Pauline Mackay

Themes for this song

seduction

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