The Shepherd's Wife


The Shepherd's wife cries o'er the knowe, Will ye come hame, will ye come hame; The Shepherd's wife cries o'er the knowe, Will ye come hame again een, jo? What will I get to my supper, Gin I come hame, gin I come hame? What will I get to my supper, Gin I come hame again een, jo? Ye'se get a panfu' o' plumpin parridge, And butter in them, and butter in them, Ye'se get a panfu' o' plumpin parridge, Gin ye'll come hame again een, jo. Ha, ha, how! that's naething that dow, I winna come hame, I canna come hame; Ha, ha, how! that's naething that dow, I winna come hame gin een, jo. A reekin fat hen, weel fryth'd i' the pan, Gin ye'll come hame, gin ye'll come hame, A reekin fat hen, weel fryth'd i' the pan, Gin ye'll come hame again e'en jo. Ha, ha, how! that's naething that dow, I winna come hame, I canna come hame; Ha, ha, how! that's naething that dow, I winna come hame gin een, jo. A weel made bed and a pair o' clean sheets, Gin ye'll come hame, gin ye'll come hame, A weel made bed and a pair o' clean sheets, Gin ye'll come hame again een, jo. Ha, ha, how! that's naething that dow, I winna come hame, I canna come hame; Ha, ha, how! that's naething that dow, I winna come hame gin een, jo. A luving wife in lily-white linens, Gin ye'll come hame, gin ye'll come hame, A luving wife in lily-white linens, Gin ye'll come hame again een, jo. Ha, ha, how! that's something that dow, I will come hame, I will come hame: Ha, ha, how! that's something that dow, I will come hame again een, jo.

Listen

Alison Peebles

About this work

This is a song by Robert Burns. It was written in 1792 and is read here by Alison Peebles.

Themes for this song

seduction marriage food

Selected for 23 October

It was on October 23rd, 1295 that King John Balliol and Philippe IV of France signed a treaty between their two countries. From that accord derived the 'Auld Alliance' uniting French and Scottish interests in opposing English power. Its legacy is the cultural 'esprit' that still links the Caledonian and Gallic peoples. That affinity has often been expressed through food and drink - Leith was an important port in the Bordeaux wine trade. The traffic in recipes was mostly one way - even haggis started out in France! It is a warm wifely welcome that proves most appetising to this herdsman.

Donny O'Rourke

Skip to top

BBC © 2014 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.