The German Lairdie


What merriment has taen the whigs, I think they be gaen mad, Sir, We' playing up their whiggish jigs, Their dancing may be sad, Sir. Sing heedle liltie, teedle liltie, Andum tandum tandie; Sing fal de dal, de dal lal lal, Sing howdle liltie dandie. The Revolution principles Has put their heads in bees, Sir; They're a' fa'n out amang themsels, Deil tak the first that grees, Sir. Sing heedle liltie, teedle liltie, Andum tandum tandie; Sing fal de dal, de dal lal lal, Sing howdle liltie dandie.

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Elaine C Smith

About this work

This is a song by Robert Burns. It is read here by Elaine C Smith.

Themes for this song

jacobitism revolution

Selected for 17 August

George IV's visit to Edinburgh on this day in 1822 represented both rehabilitation and a re-invention of Scotland. His tour guide and master of ceremonies, Sir Walter Scott, was intent on recreating 'Caledonia, stern and wild', as a loyalist and royalist, 'North Britain'. None of this would Burns have enjoyed. The Hanoverian line had started with George I whose reign began on August 1st, 1714. Although a great many Roman Catholics had a better claim to the throne vacated by Queen Anne upon her death, The Act of Settlement of 1701 ensured a Protestant succession. It remains on the statute books today. Predictably, the Jacobites rose up almost immediately. Equally predictably the revolt failed. Burns wrote this poem about George I. The later 'German lairdie' would have attracted Burns's scorn too.

Donny O'Rourke

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