I'm o'er young to Marry Yet


I'm o'er young, I'm o'er young, I'm o'er young to marry yet; I'm o'er young, 'twad be a sin To tak me frae my mammy yet. I am my mammny's ae bairn, Wi' unco folk I weary, Sir, And lying in a man's bed, I'm fley'd it mak me irie, Sir. Hallowmass is come and gane, The nights are lang in winter, Sir, And you an' I in ae bed, In trowth, I dare na venture, Sir. Fu' loud and shill the frosty wind Blaws thro' the leafless timmer, Sir; But if ye come this gate again, I'll aulder be gin simmer, Sir. I'm o'er young, I'm o'er young, I'm o'er young to marry yet; I'm o'er young, 'twad be a sin To tak me frae my mammy yet.

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Daniela Nardini

About this work

This is a song by Robert Burns. It was written in 1788 and is read here by Daniela Nardini.

More about this song

'I'm o'er young to marry yet' first appeared in the Scots Musical Museum in 1788.

Burns himself wrote that, while the chorus of the song is old, the verses are his own. The narrative of a young woman, initially unwary of men and reluctant to marry, but eventually persuaded, is a common motif in folk poetry.

Here, Burns's female character, in spite of her protestation throughout the song, concludes by inviting her wooer to return in the 'simmer'.

Pauline Mackay

Themes for this song

man woman marriage

Selected for 01 November

All Saints Day, the day after Hallowe'en, is also known as Hallowmass. Although the festival has, 'come and gane' in this song, we offer it here as our first poetic diary entry for November. One to be enjoyed now that, 'the nights are lang in winter...'.

Donny O'Rourke

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