Eppie Mcnab


O saw ye my dearie, my Eppie Mcnab? O saw ye my dearie, my Eppie Mcnab? She's down in the yard, she's kissin the Laird, She winna come hame to her ain Jock Rab. O come thy ways to me, my Eppie Mcnab; O come thy ways to me, my Eppie Mcnab; What-e'er thou hast dune, be it late, be it soon, Thou's welcome again to thy ain Jock Rab. What says she, my dearie, my Eppie Mcnab? What says she, my dearie, my Eppie Mcnab? She lets thee to wit, that she has thee forgot, And for ever disowns thee, her ain Jock Rab. O had I ne'er seen thee, my Eppie Mcnab! O had I ne'er seen thee, my Eppie Mcnab! As light as the air, and as fause as thou's fair, Thou's broken the heart o' thy ain Jock Rab!

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Tam Dean Burn

About this work

This is a song by Robert Burns. It was written in 1791 and is read here by Tam Dean Burn.

More about this song

Burns noted that, ‘the old song with this title has more wit than decency’. The model which he used was an old bawdy piece, which did not appear in print until around 1806 when it was published in The Giblet Pye.

The first stanza is virtually identical in both cases, but Burns uses the second to reveal more about Eppie’s character, as well as to move into an area which contains more sentiment and pathos.

Ralph McLean

Themes for this song

love anguish woman

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