Divine Service In The Kirk Of Lamington


As cauld a wind as ever blew, A cauld kirk, an in't but few: As cauld a minister's e'er spak; Ye'se a' be het e'er I come back.

Listen

Ian McDiarmid

About this work

This is an epigram by Robert Burns. It was written in 1791 and is read here by Ian McDiarmid.

More about this epigram

Burns carved these lines into the window of the Church in Lamington, Clydesdale, which drew the wrath of the beadle.

The minister of the Church at the time was Thomas Mitchell (d. 1811).

It is unsure when Burns actually scrawled this piece on the window, although it can be narrowed down to two potential times.

The first was in late February 1789, the second in December 1791.

However, he wrote to Jean Armour on 29 February 1789 that he had had a ‘horrid journey’ to Edinburgh, and would have passed through Lamington the previous weekend.

Ralph McLean

Themes for this epigram

religion humour

Selected for 01 August

Andrew Melville's birth on the first day of August, 1545 was to have momentous consequences for Scotland. Theologian, linguist, philosopher, university reformer and moderator, Melville protected the Presbyterian Kirk from what he took to be the Episcopalian depredations of the monarch, James VI. James had him imprisoned in the Tower of London in 1606. Upon his release, Melville was banished from Scotland, seeing out his last eleven years with great distinction as a professor at the French Academy of Sedan. Presbyterianism's ideas and ideals held lifelong sway over Burns even if he rejected some of Calvin's sterner doctrines. And not all preachers had Melville's compelling eloquence...

Donny O'Rourke

Skip to top

BBC navigation

BBC © 2014 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.