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Carl an the king come


Carl an the king come, Carl an the king come; Thou shalt dance and I will sing, Carl and the king come. An somebodie were come again, Then somebodie maun cross the main, And every man shall hae his ain, Carl an the king come. Carl an the king come, Carl an the king come; Thou shalt dance and I will sing, Carl and the king come. I trow we swapped for the warse, We gae the boot and better horse; And that we'll tell them at the cross, Carl an the king come. Carl an the king come, Carl an the king come; Thou shalt dance and I will sing, Carl and the king come. Coggie an the king come, Coggie an the king come, I'se be fou and thou'se be toom, Coggie an the king come. Coggie an the king come, Coggie an the king come; Thou shalt dance and I will sing, Coggie and the king come.

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Liz Lochhead

About this work

This is a song by Robert Burns. It was written in 1790 and is read here by Liz Lochhead.

More about this song

It is still a matter for debate as to how much of this song is original, and how much of it is traditional.

There are several versions of it published during the eighteenth-century, including one with the same theme, and set to the same air, sung by Mause in Allan Ramsay’s pastoral, The Gentle Shepherd.

James Hogg’s, Jacobite Relics (1819) contains a version which is made up of both Burns’s song and the English folklorist Joseph Ritson’s.

Carl in this song refers to Charles Edward Stuart, the young Pretender.

Ralph McLean

Themes for this song

jacobitism brotherhood drink

Selected for 19 August

On this day in 1745, the Jacobite standard was raised at Glenfinnan. The imposing monument to Bonnie Prince Charlie raised subsequently, can be glimpsed from the West Highland Line, as the train goes over the eye catching viaducts beyond Fort William. To take that train to Mallaig is to enjoy one of the great railway journeys of the world. Here is another of Burns's Jacobite poems to mark that anniversary.

Donny O'Rourke

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