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A Fragment


Green grow the rashes O, Green grow the rashes O, The lasses they hae wimble bores, The widows they hae gashes O. In sober hours I am a priest; A hero when I'm tipsey, O; But I'm a king and ev'ry thing, When wi' a wanton Gipsey, O. Green grow the rashes O, Green grow the rashes O, The lasses they hae wimble bores, The widows they hae gashes O. 'Twas late yestreen I met wi' ane, An' wow, but she was gentle, O! Ae han' she pat roun' my cravat, The tither to my penis O. Green grow the rashes O, Green grow the rashes O, The lasses they hae wimble bores, The widows they hae gashes O. I dought na speak - yet was na fley'd My heart play'd duntie, duntie, O; An' ceremony laid aside, I fairly fun' her cuntie, O. Green grow the rashes O, Green grow the rashes O, The lasses they hae wimble bores, The widows they hae gashes O.

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David Hayman

About this work

This is a song by Robert Burns. It was written in 1786 and is read here by David Hayman.

More about this song

On 03 September 1786 Burns sent A Fragment to John Richmond (1765-1846), who was a clerk working in Gavin Hamilton’s office. Along with James Smith, Burns and Richmond formed the Court of Equity.

The poem was sent along with a note stating, ‘[Jean] Armour has just brought me a fine boy and a girl at one throw. God bless the little dears!’ Burns finishes off with the words, multa desunt, meaning that ‘more follows’.

Ralph McLean

Themes for this song

sex humour

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