Happy Day for schoolboy reporters

JT, Kwaku and Michael from SE London's Woolwich Polytechnic School for Boys see 'real journalism' at work at the NBH newsroom JT, Kwaku and Michael from SE London's Woolwich Polytechnic School for Boys see 'real journalism' at work at the NBH newsroom

Do you feel that dyslexic children are underestimated and feel that they can't achieve their goals? Well, we interviewed someone at BBC Broadcasting House who is very famous and has achieved all of his goals, despite being dyslexic.

Upon reaching the BBC News Centre, we were taken to the Media Cafe, where we were given tips on how to present ourselves on video. We also went over our questions and prepared to meet Mr Henry Winkler.

Soon after, we went outside to create our introduction video. This involved some of us pointing, putting thumbs up and combing hair - imitating the great Fonz himself. This was JT's highlight of the day (as well as the interview). 'It was very funny. Even though it was very tiring, it was worth the hard work.'

Henry Winkler Henry Winkler is 'a true role model'
Honest answers

During the interview we asked many questions, and Henry Winkler responded with very positive and moving answers. One special answer inspired everyone in the interview. 'No matter how you learn, you are still special. The only thing that matters is what comes from inside you, what you can give to society and what is unique about yourself.'

This was Kwaku's highlight of the day. 'What he said was very truthful and honest. The message he gave doesn't just apply to dyslexic children, it applies to everyone.'

Start Quote

As the doors swung open, our ears were filled with the quiet hustle and bustle of professional journalism. ”

End Quote JT, Kwaku and Michael

Mr Winkler spoke like a true role model. He looked us in the eye and made us realise just how important it is that the stigma surrounding learning difficulties is dispelled. His kind nature allowed us to empathise with his struggles and he made us see that by making small changes in our daily approach, we can all make a difference.

We even taught Mr Winkler how to do the azonto [a dance]. This was Michael's highlight of the day. 'He taught us new things, so we thought that we would do the same. He is actually quite good … for a beginner.'

After interviewing Henry Winkler, we were privileged enough to be taken into the BBC Newsroom. We have never experienced anything like it. As the doors swung open, our ears were filled with the quiet hustle and bustle of professional journalism. Everyone was so friendly and it was so exciting to see the various processes of news reporting firsthand. We even got to see the weather being filmed.

Seeing the BBC Newsroom and being inside it allowed us to see what real journalism is about and motivated us to achieve our own news reporting aspirations.

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