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Lord Haw-Haw | The Nazi broadcaster who threatened Britain

About this collection

William Joyce, aka Lord Haw-Haw, was a notorious broadcaster of Nazi propaganda to the UK during World War II. His announcement 'Germany calling, Germany calling' was a familiar sound across the airwaves, introducing threats and misinformation that he broadcast from his Hamburg base.

In 1945, Joyce was captured and returned to Britain, where he was later hanged for treason. This collection features some of his broadcasts and interviews with those who knew him. Wartime documents reveal the fear caused by Lord Haw-Haw and how the BBC worked to counteract his propaganda.

Lord Haw-Haw Collection

A memo on listeners' habits.

A Memo on Listeners' Habits

WRITTEN 1939
3 PAGES

A memo outlines the decrease in listeners to BBC radio.

go to A Memo on Listeners' Habits
A letter from the War Office.

A Letter from the War Office, Whitehall

WRITTEN 1939
1 PAGE

Action must be taken against Lord Haw-Haw.

go to A Letter from the War Office, Whitehall
A letter from Oliver Baldwin to Robert Vansittart.

A Letter from the Son of a Former Prime Minister

WRITTEN 1939
1 PAGE

Oliver Baldwin writes to a senior British diplomat about the Haw-Haw problem.

go to A Letter from the Son of a Former Prime Minister
A letter from the BBC Director-General.

A Letter from the BBC Director-General

WRITTEN 1939
5 PAGES

The BBC's Director-General writes to the government's Director of Propaganda in Enemy Countries.

go to A Letter from the BBC Director-General
A BBC report into propaganda broadcast from Hamburg.

An Audience Research Special Report

WRITTEN c. 1940
2 PAGES

Who is listening to Hamburg propaganda and when?

go to An Audience Research Special Report
The text of a conversation between John Reith and Frederick Ogilvie.

Record of Conversation with Sir John Reith

WRITTEN 1940
4 PAGES

A BBC Director-General disagrees with his predecessor.

go to Record of Conversation with Sir John Reith
A document by the Ministry of Information.

Principles and Objectives of British Wartime Propaganda

WRITTEN c. 1940
2 PAGES

The Ministry of Information's policy on British propaganda.

go to Principles and Objectives of British Wartime Propaganda
A letter from a major in the British Expeditionary Force.

'The Only Real Remedy Lies with the BBC'

WRITTEN c. 1940
1 PAGE

Lord Haw-Haw is a risk to military morale.

go to 'The Only Real Remedy Lies with the BBC'
A letter from the London Press Exchange.

A Letter from the London Press Exchange

WRITTEN 1940
1 PAGE

An enquiry about one of Cadbury's chocolate factories.

go to A Letter from the London Press Exchange
A letter from BBC Monitoring.

A Letter from BBC Monitoring

WRITTEN 1940
1 PAGE

Fry's chocolate factory is not about to be bombed.

go to A Letter from BBC Monitoring
A handwritten letter about Lord Haw-Haw rumours.

Rumours

WRITTEN c. 1941
1 PAGE

Haw-Haw rumours are spreading across Britain.

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