Tremayne wine bottle

Contributed by Cornwall Museums

Tremayne wine bottle

THIS OBJECT IS PART OF THE PROJECT 'A HISTORY OF CORNWALL IN 100 OBJECTS'.

HELIGAN GARDENS. This type of glass bottle is well-known in Cornwall. From 1650 on glass wine bottles were often given a mark to show ownership. A small blob of glass would be dropped on the shoulder or side of the bottle and impressed with a brass seal before it cooled. Dating probably from the second half of the 18th century, it would have been stored on its side to prevent the wine becoming corked. The Tremaynes were Victorian garden pioneers and their pineapple pits brought a touch of the exotic to Cornwall.

The bottle was found behind the Visitor Reception building at The Lost Gardens of Heligan in October 2010. It was stored in a workshop until 29th September 2010, when it was realised that the crest on the bottle belonged to the Tremayne family. Although an old Cornish family their punning arms are based on the French 'tres mains' - three hands, shown here as three linked arms.

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