Discovery on the cusp of decline

Contributed by Angela Munslow

Discovery on the cusp of decline

My object has a place in the history of my part of the world, as it was made on the cusp of the decline of the Pottery Industry in Stoke-on-Trent, and perhaps an object like this will never be able to be made again in the same manner in the Potteries.

It is connected with one of the most famous pottery firms in Stoke-on-Trent -Royal Doulton.,who at the time were funding the Sir Henry Doulton School of Sculpture where I studied between 1990-1992. Whilst there I won a commission for a large sculpture for Expo 92 in Seville, which they were sponsoring.

It was the largest piece they had ever made by slip casting in bone china standing 122cm high. This posed a lot of problems in the sculpting and the the production. It involved cutting the figure into 7 managable pieces and a total of 24 moulds being made. Each piece took 50 gallons of slip (liquid clay)to make.It took twenty attempts to get a perfect sculpture.

One year after Discovery was produced Royal Doulton could no longer afford to fund the school and it closed. Royal Doulton's decline continued until its takeover by Wedgewood in 2004.

My Discovery is an Artists copy, the originals' whereabouts is unknown to me

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About this object

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Location

Alsager, Stoke-on-Trent

Culture
Period
Theme
Size
H:
122cm
Colour
Material

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