St. George Depicted in Stained Glass

Contributed by Holy Trinity York Churches Conservation Trust

St. George Depicted in Stained Glass

St. George, the patron saint of England, is shown in the east window of Holy Trinity church, paid for by the vicar here in the year 1471.

Though we think of St George as being the patron saint of England he is in fact not English and he is not just our patron saint, but is the patron saint to numerous other places such as Aragon, Catalonia, Georgia, Lithuania, Palestine, Portugal, Germany and Greece; and of Moscow, Istanbul, Genoa and Venice (second to Saint Mark).

He is also the patron saint for many occupations: soldiers, archers, cavalry and chivalry, farmers, field workers, riders, and saddlers. He has recently become the patron saint of the Scouts.

St George was born in Cappadocia, an area of Turkey, in 3rd century AD. His parents were Christians. When George was a small boy his father died and his mother moved back to her native Palestine. When he grew up he became a Roman soldier and protested against Rome's persecution of Christians. For disobeying the Emporer Diocletian, he was imprisoned and tortured, though he remained true to his faith. He was beheaded at Lydda in Palestine.

The st George of the English Legend emerges in the Middle Ages.

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Location

York, England

Culture
Period

1471

Theme
Size
Colour
Material

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