Fordson Model 'N' Tractor

Contributed by Museum of English Rural Life

Fordson Model 'N' Tractor

The Fordson tractor was first developed by Henry Ford's motor
company in the USA in 1917 and thousands were imported to Britain
during and immediately following the First World War. It was of light
construction, without the cumbersome chassis that characterised the
design of previous tractors, and was made in such large numbers as
to be affordable by ordinary farmers. This Model N was a later,
modified version which was built during the 1930s at Ford's new
Dagenham factory near London. In the period between the First and
Second World Wars, the Fordson was a crucial factor in the gradual
shift from horse to tractor power on British farms. This tractor was reputedly first registered in 1937/ 8. The accompanying instruction book was printed in 1933. It was purchased in unrestored condition by Mr. Long in 1975 from a collector in Farnham, and has now been fully restored to working condition; sand blasted and re-painted by Mr. Long himself.

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Culture
Period

1937

Theme
Size
D:
263cm
Colour
Material

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