Roman window from Scotland

Contributed by The Hunterian

Roman window from Scotland

This object from the collection of the Hunterian Museum was chosen, and written about, by Scott Ross, honours student, Department of Classics, University of Glasgow.

This window was found in Bar Hill fort, in the Strathclyde region of Scotland. It is made from four metal strips joining at right angles to form a square. Metal nails hold the iron panels together at each right angle. Inside the metal frame some glass fragments remain - at one point the complete frame was filled with glass. This is a very rare item and truly fascinating.

I picked this object because it is just spectacular, and easy to imagine a Roman peering through this window onto their enemies or even admiring the land which stretched out beyond the fort, or someone looking in the window. I also picked this object because I am nosey, and always stare out my window onto my street. It is nice to imagine that a Roman could have been just as nosey as me.

However, there is also a brutal aspect to this object. The harsh metal panels and iron spikes protruding from each corner shows that this window was on a fort which had seen times of turmoil and gives the viewer an idea of how dreary it would have been to live in

Comments are closed for this object

Comments

Most of the content on A History of the World is created by the contributors, who are the museums and members of the public. The views expressed are theirs and unless specifically stated are not those of the BBC or the British Museum. The BBC is not responsible for the content of any external sites referenced. In the event that you consider anything on this page to be in breach of the site’s House Rules please Flag This Object.

About this object

Click a button to explore other objects in the timeline

Location

Bar Hill Roman fort

Culture
Period

AD 142-180

Theme
Size
H:
41cm
W:
25cm
Colour
Material

View more objects from people in Glasgow and West of Scotland.

BBC navigation

BBC © 2014 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.