Postcard sent from France in World War I

Contributed by Blackthorns CP School

Postcard sent from France in World War I

This postcard describes what a solider saw and experienced on the front line in France in 1915. It was sent to Miss Purser (an artist at the Royal Hibernian Academy in Ireland):

"Since back from Paris, moved to one of the big fighting places. Attended part of last Battle in the chalk country. Saw any amount of wonderfully interesting things - too many - cannot tell them - not mentioning the sad ones. There are not tears enough in the world for the suffering and (scenes?) of such a war. I wish you could see once the wounded ones going back, painfully, slowly, many miles. Notice one does not see the worst ones. Poor people, plastered with mud from head to foot - the colour indescribable - the picture of suffering, misery, pain - we got here yesterday, a few 15 inches shells. The trouble with them is that there is no first (...?) whizzing. They are heard but when cracking - sounds like a monstrous block of stone tumbling down - More awful fighting expected soon. Kindest greetings. Looking forward to getting a letter. One feels exceedingly lonely."

I was surprised this postcard survived 95 years and I was sad to read about the soldier's feelings. It brought the War alive.

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About this object

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Location

France

Culture
Period

1915

Theme
Size
H:
9cm
W:
14cm
Colour
Material

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