The Scottish Kilt

Contributed by jennifer mcpartlin

After visiting Scotland, I found the tartan pattern very interesting and discovered that there is a lot of history, meaning and importance to it. There are many different tartan designs representing different clans and names; there is a pattern for most Scottish names as well as my own. Red, green, blue and yellow tartans are the most common. History has it; the meaning of the colours has changed since the 19th century. It's said that red tartan was worn in battle so blood would not show, green resembled the forest, blue symbolising lakes and rivers and yellow resembling crops. Today, the colours identify religion as red and green tartans represent Catholics and the blue represents Protestants. The divide is important in Scotland as one can identify people's religion by what colour tartan is worn. Ultimately the tartan kilt is a universal symbol of "scottishness" and represents that culture and all its history.

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