Lieutenant Tulloch's RAMC microscope

Contributed by Army Medical Services Museum

Lieutenant Tulloch's (RAMC) microscope: Trustee's of The Army Medical Services Museum

Used in the research for a cure for Sleeping Sickness.The microscope was originally used by Lieutenant F M G Tulloch (Royal Army Medical Corps), who was seeking a cure for Sleeping Sickness whilst serving in Uganda in 1905. He subsequently contracted the disease and died in 1927. The microscope was later used by Lieutenant General Sir W Leishaman (Royal Army Medical Corps) who was instrumental in the search for a vaccine against typhoid. It was later passed onto Major General Horace Emerson (Royal Army Medical Corps), Director of Military Hygiene, who then had it passed onto a student with a specific interest in pathological research.

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  • 1. At 10:56 on 7 August 2012, Harry wrote:

    Leishman's name is miss spelt above. I was not aware of his work on typhoid but he is famous for the discovery of the parasites that cause leishmaniasis which he first observed whilst working at RAMC in 1901. Could he have been using this microscope at the time?

    He also developed Leishman's stain for malaria parasites. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Boog_Leishman

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