HAL 9000 from 2001 - A Space Odyssey

Contributed by Chrissywissy

HAL 9000 from 2001 - A Space Odyssey

In 1968 a film called "2001 - A Space Odyssey" was released. Written by Arthur C Clarke, it tells the story of man's curiosity and his first steps in visiting other worlds. A space vessel is sent to Jupiter to investigate strange signals eminating from this far off planet. During the voyage, the HAL 9000 "artificial intelligence" computer which controlled all aspects of the ships operation, malfunctioned owing to an internal conflict of commands and it killed the crew except for one man. You will remember the chilling dialogue: Dave: "Open the pod bays doors HAL" HAL: "I'm afaid I can't do that Dave". In the mid seventies I discovered the original HAL 9000 "Lens Faceplate" and "Processor Room Key" in a junk shop in Paddington and I have had them in my possession since then. The actual lens was missing but, after much research and with the help of some people in the USA I obtained a lens of exactly the same type. When one shines a torch in the back, the eerie red lite is uncannily like that shown in the film. These amazing artefacts have been to the USA and have been exhibited in a 2001 exhibition. This icon is perhaps a warning to us that the AI computers can be deadly!

Comments are closed for this object

Most of the content on A History of the World is created by the contributors, who are the museums and members of the public. The views expressed are theirs and unless specifically stated are not those of the BBC or the British Museum. The BBC is not responsible for the content of any external sites referenced. In the event that you consider anything on this page to be in breach of the site’s House Rules please Flag This Object.

About this object

Click a button to explore other objects in the timeline

Location

Twickenham

Culture
Period
Theme
Size
H:
30cm
W:
10cm
D:
10cm
Colour
Material

View more objects from people in London.

BBC © 2014 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.