A Sociable Tricycle

Contributed by Future Boy

The 'Sociable' was one of many versions of tricycle developed in the 1880s. It got its name from the side-by-side position of the seats.
At that time a normal bicycle was the 'Ordinary' - better known as the Penny Farthing, but its high seat did not appeal to everyone and was especially unpractical for ladies in long skirts.
The 'Sociable' also offered an option that found favour with courting couples!
They were slow, heavy and quite awkward to steer and their popularity was short lived.
The one in this picture was used on the roads in Flintshire in the 1880s and now is found on display at the National Waterfront Museum in Swansea.

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  • 1. At 13:32 on 13 July 2012, MatildaJarvis wrote:

    My Harrogate great-grandmother had a Sociable and loved it. Her diary for 1887 records how happy she was when the weather was finally warm enough for her and her sister to go out on it, and how she had missed it over the winter. However her fiance, my grandfather-to-be and keen cyclist, no doubt feeling that a Sociable was hardly a manly machine, persuaded her that they should have a tandem. "Poor old Sociable sold today - had last run yesterday but did not know it at the time...Feel very lost without a tricycle."

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