Colliery Ambulance Trolley

Contributed by East Lothian Museums

Colliery Ambulance Trolley

This stretcher and trolley were part of the equipment used at Prestongrange Colliery in case of accident. Prestongrange pit had a complete rescue team, who won prizes for their hard work. The rescue team had to regularly complete training exercises to make sure they were fit and ready incase of an emergency.

It was difficult if someone became injured whilst underground as they would have to be moved from a very small space where the ground, or ceiling, might be unstable. While doctors did attend if there was an accident, the mines' rescue team were the people who had to get the injured person above ground so they could be treated. This trolley looks as if it would have been very uncomfortable and quite unstable when being wheeled around outside. It is difficult to imagine that this was part of the equipment which was supposed to save lives right up until the 1960s as it looks so basic.

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About this object

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Location

Prestonpans

Culture
Period
Theme
Size
H:
82cm
W:
203cm
D:
86cm
Colour
Material

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