Engraved Roman distance slab

Contributed by The Hunterian

Engraved Roman distance slab

This is an elaborate and excellent example of Roman distance slabs, engraved stones which are uniquely preserved in Scotland. They record the distance of sections of the Antonine Wall constructed by each of the three military Legions stationed in Britain in AD 142. This stone features a reclining figure of a winged and semi-naked Victory. Her left elbow rests upon a globe which represents her authority and a wild boar is depicted within a panel below her, a symbol of the 20th Legion who erected this part of the wall near Old Kilpatrick fort.

This object from the collection of the Hunterian Museum was selected by Louisa Hammersley, postgraduate student at the Department of Archaeology, University of Glasgow. Louisa says "I selected this object because, apart from being beautifully crafted, this stone is a well preserved example of very unique objects left behind by the Romans in Scotland. I like the fact that the soldiers of the 20th Legion wanted a physical and highly visible commemoration of their hard work digging and building precisely 4,411 feet of this massive structure across the centre of Scotland."

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About this object

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Location

Vicinity of Antonine Wall

Culture
Period

2nd century

Theme
Size
H:
73cm
W:
69cm
D:
14cm
Colour
Material

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