Hiroshima Jam Jar

Contributed by Derek Palmer

This object was recovered from the debris of Hiroshima after the world's first atomic bomb at the end of World War II. It marks a turning point in human warfare.

Heat of approximately 1,500 degrees centigrade is required to produce this level of deformity. Scientific examination showed that a virtually instantaneous heat wave struck this object and passed as quickly as it had arrived so that the Jar resumed its solidified form withoutleaving 'stress' marks.

Mr Douglas Hardy a keen Bible student who acquired the jar noted the similarity of the terrible effects of radiation sickness that followed the explosion with the words of an Old Testament Bible prophet, Zechariah -
Zechariah 14:12 ?this shall be the plague wherewith the LORD will smite all the people that have fought against Jerusalem; Their flesh shall consume away while they stand upon their feet, and their eyes shall consume away in their holes, and their tongue shall consume away in their mouth.

With Israel losing support , and feeling in peril from Hamas and Iran committed to her annihilation, she may soon want to unleash the Nuclear weapons many feel sure she has.

The Jar is a stark reminder of what may then ensue

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About this object

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Location

Hiroshima, Japan

Culture
Period

1945

Theme
Size
H:
11cm
W:
8.5cm
D:
6cm
Colour
Material

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