Snakeskin shoes

Contributed by Lucy_granville

These shoes belonged to my grandmother Gally. Made in India, they were part of her wedding trousseau once she had made the grueling passage there to marry my grandfather in the 1940's.

She sold her possessions to get the fare, arriving with barely any luggage. Nothing like them would have been available to buy in the UK during WWII.

The uppers are soft and matte, cradling the foot like a pouch. The diamond-shaped snake scales perfectly emboss the skin colourations.

The high collar at the back comes right up the ankle, so that in combination with the three inch heel the foot is given a long-line elegance.

The toe puff is unusually curved, they are slenderly waisted, and the sole is the same rich tan leather as the trim around the edge of the shoe.

Gally had to write to the MoD five times for permission to travel to India. Every time, in the box labeled Reason For Travel, she would state, to be married.

They repeatedly refused, and she wrote back again and again. I'll not give up, she said.

Finally, she received the answer she had been waiting for, with a handwritten note wishing her joy.

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  • 1 comment
  • 1. At 17:44 on 19 February 2012, jenap wrote:

    I wonder if there is any brand/stamps/markings on these shoes?

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