Reverend James Guthrie's Ring

Contributed by Smith Museum Stirling Scotland

Reverend James Guthrie's Ring

The Reverend James Guthrie (1612-1661) was one of the most important church ministers in Scotland in the Covenanting era, and his influence in Stirling has lasted in the centuries since his death, by execution on 1 June 1661. He gave his ring to his niece as he ascended the scaffold, and it has passed through the family of six generations of daughters of Church of Scotland ministers. Guthrie was a distinguished scholar who taught theology in the University of St Andrews. He was persuaded to come to Stirling in 1649 as Minister of the Church of the Holy Rude. He was strongly opposed to Episcopal forms of church government and worship, and his sermons were militant, uncompromising and very popular. Disagreements over a document known as the Remonstrance of the Presbyterie of Sterling in 1651 led to the physical division of the Church of the Holy Rude into the East and West Churches, with Mr James preaching in the East. The division was removed only in 1930. Guthrie was an important figure in the ongoing wars within the protestant churches and between church and state. The effects of this are still felt today across the entire religious community.

Comments are closed for this object

Most of the content on A History of the World is created by the contributors, who are the museums and members of the public. The views expressed are theirs and unless specifically stated are not those of the BBC or the British Museum. The BBC is not responsible for the content of any external sites referenced. In the event that you consider anything on this page to be in breach of the site’s House Rules please Flag This Object.

About this object

Click a button to explore other objects in the timeline

Location

Stirling

Culture
Period
Theme
Size
H:
2cm
W:
2cm
D:
0.2cm
Colour
Material

View more objects from people in Tayside and Central.

BBC © 2014 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.