cast aluminium ashtray

Contributed by airshipcollector

cast aluminium ashtray

This cast aluminium ashtray was made from the wreckage of the R38 airship salvaged from the Humber. The R38 was made by the British for the American millitary and was renamed the ZRII but crashed in the Humber estuary near Hull on 24th August 1921 during tight-turn trials. The circumstances of the crash are covered in detail on the BBC webpage www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/history/making_history/makhist10_prog10a.shtml .Needless to say the Americans never bought British airships again! Also I know of no other airship tight-turn trials at low altitude. Also the demise of the R38 was a significant point in the end of lighter than air travel which for the UK was completed by the R101 disaster although the 1937 crash of the German Hindenburg is best known worldwide because it was one of the very first disasters captured by the video on camera. One other point - there is an irony as well. The wreckage of the R38 was turned into a souvenir ashtray whereas when the Hindenburg crashed it was nightmare propaganda for the Nazis who promptly dismantlled the most successful airship ever - the Graf Zeppelin - and recycled the airship metal to make planes that would bomb the UK in WW2.

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About this object

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Location

Lincoln Street, Hull

Culture
Period

after 1921 and almost certainly by 1925

Theme
Size
W:
13.7cm
D:
1.5cm
Colour
Material

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