Mexican Horse Saddle

Contributed by Smith Museum Stirling Scotland

Mexican Horse Saddle

Horse Saddle originally belonging to Robert Bontine Cunninghame Graham, Politician, Cowboy, Writer and adventurer. It tells us about his remarkable adventuring spirit in South and North America, Africa and Southern Europe. His writings cover his life both locally and nationally and his influence on the politics of Scotland, Britain and Ireland are still felt today. Cunninghame Graham bought this saddle in Mexico in the 1870's when he attempted to make money by running a wagon train from Texas to Mexico. He had spend several years as a gaucho in Argentina and also bought a ranch in Texas; which was burnt down by an apache raiding party led by Victorio. He also spent time with Tschiffely on his famous horse ride from the Buenos Aires to Washington. Founder of the Scottish Labour Party and first chairman of the Scottish National Party. He was anti royalist, Anti Imperialist, Anti- Capitalist, a champion of miners and metal workers and Irish and Women's Rights. He was arrested and imprisoned for a riot in Trafalgar Square In the late 1880's. When he died in Argentina in 1936 he was laid in state, such was the admiration of his life in Argentina. Now in our museum collection.

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About this object

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Location

Mexico

Culture
Period

1860's

Theme
Size
H:
25cm
W:
40cm
D:
40cm
Colour
Material

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