Model of a Smallman Safety Clip

Contributed by Nuneaton Museum and Art Gallery

Model of  a Smallman Safety Clip

The safety clip was invented and refined by Mr A White of Hartshill and James Smallman of Nuneaton between 1893 and 1912. This model was used to demonstrate the safety clip across the world. At the time of its invention coal was moved around the mines in tubs linked to a wire rope. The clips were developed to make attaching the tubs to the rope safer. Previously crushed limbs and trapped fingers were a frequent problem. The clip was simple in design and incorporated a locking device to stop the tubs becoming detached accidentally. The clips continue to be used today in India.

Nuneaton Museum & Art Gallery
Riversley Park, Coton Road, Nuneaton CV11 5TU

Nuneaton Museum & Art Gallery was established in 1913 through the generosity of Edward Melly who made his fortune in Nuneaton from mining.
The museum has permanent galleries displaying local history, the life of George Eliot and a fine art collection.

There is also a lively temporary exhibition programme. Activities for families are included in many of the displays. Free activities are provided for children in school holidays. The museum has full wheelchair access.

See www.nuneatonandbedworth.gov.uk/museum for further details

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Nuneaton, Warwickshire.

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