Poster of Portugese Revolution 25.4.74

Contributed by Pamela Manfield

Poster of Portugese Revolution 25.4.74

This represents the Carnation Revolution of 1974, when the Portugese nation freed itself from a fascist, repressive government. Portugal had traditionally been ruled by "100 families" who, with the church, controlled all the land and the wealth. The revolution was led by Army officers disenchanted by the violent wars in the colonies of Angola and Mozambique who decided to take over the country and bring in democratic processes. The poorly-dressed child is placing the carnation of revolution into a gun barrel held by 3 hands - the army and the workers in agriculture and industry.

The broadcasting of 'Grandola' written and sung by the folk singer Jose Alfonso, at midnight on national radio, signalled all was in place for the coup. Overnight the country moved to an excited discussion of its future, with our students, learning English at the British Institure, thrilled that they could now talk about politics. There were some years of chaos and indecision until Portugal emerged as a proudly democratic country. For me this represents the excitement of being in a country at a vital point in its history and reminds me how we too often take democracy and freedom of speech for granted.

Comments are closed for this object

Most of the content on A History of the World is created by the contributors, who are the museums and members of the public. The views expressed are theirs and unless specifically stated are not those of the BBC or the British Museum. The BBC is not responsible for the content of any external sites referenced. In the event that you consider anything on this page to be in breach of the site’s House Rules please Flag This Object.

About this object

Click a button to explore other objects in the timeline

Location

Oporto, Portugal

Culture
Period

1974

Theme
Size
Material

View more objects from people in Beds Herts Bucks.

BBC © 2014 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.