Charles Rennie Mackintosh lug chair

Contributed by The Hunterian

Charles Rennie Mackintosh lug chair

Charles Rennie Mackintosh (1868 - 1928) was a Scottish artist, designer and architect. He married Margaret Macdonald in 1900 and the newly-weds moved into a rented flat at 120 Mains Street in Glasgow.

This unusual dark stained oak chair was designed for 120 Mains Street. In 1906 Mackintosh and Margaret bought their first house in Glasgow's west end, at 6 Florentine Terrace (later renamed 78 Southpark Avenue). The chair was incorporated into the drawing room of this new house

The title of the chair comes from the carved wooden roundels or lugs at the front. They have stylized plant designs on them. Mackintosh was inspired by nature and used plant forms and motifs in a lot of his work.

The box-like structure of the chair creates a private space for an individual sitting on the low seat, as well as providing shelter from draughts.

The dark shade of the wood contrasts beautifully with the pale upholstery. The fabric has a subtle pattern of square motifs, also used in other areas of the house.

This object from the collection of the Hunterian Museum and Art Gallery was selected by Monica Callaghan who created the Mackintosh House Relic Challenge.

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About this object

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Location

Glasgow

Culture
Period

1900

Theme
Size
H:
131cm
W:
74cm
D:
72cm
Colour
Material

View more objects from people in Glasgow and West of Scotland.

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