Professional versus personal social media use

How should journalists manage their personal and professional social media activity, and what are the issues to bear in mind? Rory Cellan-Jones is the BBC’s technology correspondent.

Social media has led to the line between journalists’ personal and professional lives becoming more blurred than ever before.

It encourages people to make great contacts, share information and promote content.

Social media is a very seductive space. It encourages you to reveal details about your personal life and the social media ‘audience’ is always keen to build up a picture of the person behind the story.  

In this video Rory Cellan-Jones explains how he juggles his two social media personas and governs his activity by the principle: ‘Don’t say (or do) anything that you wouldn’t on 5 Live.’

The BBC News Social Media Guidelines highlight particular issues to consider. They can be summarised as ‘don’t do anything stupid’.

Remember that even when you are acting in a personal capacity you are on public show.

 

The College of Journalism offers face-to-face and online courses for BBC staff: 

Social Media & Connected Journalism

BBC training is available to non-BBC staff on a commercial basis.