Profile: Olympic portals editor

The London 2012 Olympics showcased not just some of the greatest sportsmen and women from around the world, but also the best in broadcasting and creative talent from the BBC. Matt Millington, video portals editor for sport and the commentary manager during the London 2012 games, talks about the skills and experience needed to bring a multitude of sports to a multitude of screens.

From the dramatic opening ceremony to the thrills of 'Super Saturday', the BBC’s coverage was widely praised around the world, and we have brought together our own highlights in our new collection of case study films, taking a detailed look at how the Olympics were brought to you, from build-up to broadcast.

Matt Millington, video portals editor for sport and the commentary manager during the London 2012 games, talks about the skills and experience needed to bring a multitude of sports to a multitude of screens, including the red button, online and other platforms such as connected television and mobile phones.

From his early experience working on Ceefax pages to working with the Red Button team on live events from Wimbledon and The Open, Matt has built a solid understanding of all platforms and television production, as well as a thorough knowledge of the audience.

"Keep up to speed with what’s happening now and what’s happening in the next couple of years." – Matt Millington

From offering only six streams for the Beijing Games, the BBC was able to deliver content to 24 streams, with over 20 million viewers watching the Olympics on red button services. Matt explains, “Obviously you need an understanding of how television production works but you also need to know how different content works on different platforms, because every platform has a different requirement, so knowing your platform and your viewers per platform is a key part of the job.”

The London 2012 Olympics coverage used a 70 strong commentary team and a large part of Matt's role was dealing with the commentators. While this didn’t mean he needed to match their knowledge and statistical expertise, he did need a good understanding of all sports, something he felt was essential if working in a live sports environment. “You don’t need to be an expert in any sport, but you do need to be a bit of a jack of all trades really.”

His advice to those keen to work in this area is to really understand the different platforms available as well as developments as they change over time.

 

Note: All London 2012 Olympics content contained within bbc.co.uk/collegeofproduction is for original purpose only and under rights agreement is forbidden to be used or sub-licensed elsewhere.