Journalism

Events

The College of Journalism runs seminars and conferences that examine the big issues facing both journalists and journalism. These events range from briefings on major stories by senior BBC journalists for their colleagues, to big national or international conferences on, for example, hyperlocal journalism or the role of social media. In this section you can view video reports of events.

Connecting Communities conference

There has often been a tense relationship between mainstream and community media. So how can they begin to work together locally, globally and culturally?

Data Journalism Day: Holding power to account

An event focusing on how data journalism is helping investigative reporters all over the world to break major stories and attempt to hold power to account

Reporting Iran: Robin Lustig, James Reynolds and Sadeq Saba

What’s the background detail on the big stories coming out of Iran? What are the key issues BBC journalists need to be aware of? Find out in this video briefing with the BBC specialists

Reflections series at the Frontline Club

In ‘Reflections’, respected journalists talk about their career, what motivates them and the people who have inspired them - and take a look back at some of their best work

Reporting Europe: Gavin Hewitt and Philippa Thomas

There is so much more to the European Union than summits and budgets, as BBC Europe editor Gavin Hewitt explained at this event

Understanding public's economic concerns

What do BBC audiences think about its coverage of the economy? Find out what research tells us about the things people are interested in

War and spin: Allan Little, James Rodgers, Kim Sengupta

Two experienced war reporters talk to special correspondent Allan Little about the way PR is used to influence international opinion in modern conflicts

Young freelancers: Unprepared, inexperienced and in a war zone

Are young freelance reporters putting themselves in unnecessary danger? Senior journalists discussed what can be done to minimise the risks

Violent images on BBC News

How does the BBC decide on the use of violent and graphic images like those showing a chemical attack in Syria? Have its principles changed over the years?